Homeless shelters

In this Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo Worcester Police officer Angel Rivera, right, returns a license to an unidentified man as Rivera asks if he has been tested for Hepatitis A at the entrance to a tent where the man spent the night in a wooded area, in Worcester, Mass. Dan Cahill, City of Worcester sanitary inspector, walks behind center. The city was hit hard when recent hepatitis A outbreaks across the country started sickening and killing homeless people and illicit drug users. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 12, 2019 - 11:41 am
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP) — This industrial city in central Massachusetts has had many nicknames through the years, including "the Heart of the Commonwealth" and "Wormtown." Among them was this less-known medical moniker: "Hepatitisville." Worcester has endured several outbreaks of the liver-battering...
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December 18, 2018 - 2:45 pm
In a story Dec. 17 about a count of homeless people in the U.S., The Associated Press reported erroneously which tax Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Executive Director Peter Lynn credited for helping reduce homelessness in the 2018 count. Lynn was crediting a Los Angeles city ballot measure...
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FILE - This file photo from Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, shows John Flickner, 78, holding his medical marijuana vaporizer inside a Niagara Falls, N.Y., homeless shelter. Although he has a prescription, the wheelchair-bound Flickner was evicted from a federally subsidized housing facility that has a zero-tolerance policy on drugs, highlighting the conflict between state and federal marijuana rules. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson, File)
December 11, 2018 - 7:24 pm
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. (AP) — A 78-year-old New York man who was evicted from federally subsidized housing because he uses medical marijuana for pain said Tuesday that the conflicting state and federal pot laws that left him homeless are now threatening his medical care. "The federal government has...
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Lorrainda Smith, right, and husband Wilmer Capps prepare to spend the first night out of the hospital with their two-day-old son Luke in a parking lot in Panama City, Fla., Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Capps says he and wife had no choice but to camp out the night their son was released from an Alabama hospital because their home in Panama City was badly damaged by Hurricane Michael. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
October 18, 2018 - 10:48 am
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Their home full of soggy furniture and mosquitoes, Wilmer Capps was desperate to find shelter for his wife and their son Luke, born just three days after Hurricane Michael ravaged the Florida Panhandle. So Capps, his wife Lorrainda Smith and little Luke settled in for the...
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Anthony Torres poses for a photograph at his brother's home in Atco, N.J., Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. Torres says he was the rider caught shaving on a New Jersey Transit train in a video that went viral. Torres said he was just trying to clean up after days spent in a homeless shelter. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
September 17, 2018 - 8:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A man who was mocked online after he was recorded shaving at his seat on a commuter train headed out of New York City said he was just trying to clean up after days spent in a homeless shelter. Anthony Torres, 56, told The Associated Press that the people judging him on social media...
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File-This undated file photo shows the entrance to an alley known as Cooper Court, a homeless camp in Boise, Idaho. A federal appellate court says cities can't prosecute people for sleeping on the streets if they have nowhere else to go. In a ruling handed down Tuesday, Sept. 4, 2018, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with six homeless Boise, Idaho residents who sued the city in 2009 alleging that a local ordinance that bans sleeping on the streets amounted to cruel and unusual punishment. The ruling could impact several other cities across the western U.S.(Adam Cotterell/Boise State Public Radio via AP, File)
September 04, 2018 - 7:21 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Cities can't prosecute people for sleeping on the streets if they have nowhere else to go because it amounts to cruel and unusual punishment, which is unconstitutional, a federal appeals court said Tuesday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with six homeless people...
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FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2016 file photo, a man stands outside his tent on Division Street in San Francisco. San Francisco voters will decide in November 2018 whether to tax large businesses to pay for homeless and housing services in a city struggling with income inequality. Supporters collected enough signatures to get the measure on the ballot. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
July 16, 2018 - 9:46 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco voters will decide in November whether to tax large businesses to pay for homeless and housing services, an issue that set off a battle in another West Coast city struggling with income inequality. The city elections department verified Monday that supporters had...
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FILE - In this April 16, 2018, file photo, Bill Gates, Co-Chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, talks to the media after a meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace in Paris. The Seattle region is home to the two richest men in America, but while Amazon's Jeff Bezos is blamed by some for rising rents and clogged city streets, Gates is largely admired for helping lead the computing revolution and for the billions he donates through his philanthropy. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
June 30, 2018 - 12:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The Seattle region is home to America's two richest men, but their local legacies to date represent two very different eras for the city. While Amazon's Jeff Bezos is blamed by some for rising rents and clogged city streets, Bill Gates is largely admired for helping lead the...
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June 28, 2018 - 6:37 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Cyndi Lauper is spearheading research into how state governments deal with youth homelessness — especially for LGBTQ youth. Lauper's True Colors Fund released a report Thursday measuring how each state holds up on providing services such as housing and mental health for homeless...
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People attending a Seattle City Council meeting hold signs that read "Tax Amazon, Housing for All," and "No Tax on Jobs" listen to public comment on the debate over a possible council vote whether or not to repeal of a tax on large companies such as Amazon and Starbucks that was intended to combat a growing homelessness crisis, Tuesday, June 12, 2018, at City Hall in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
June 12, 2018 - 9:25 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle leaders on Tuesday repealed a tax on large companies such as Amazon and Starbucks after a backlash from businesses, a stark reversal from a month ago when the City Council unanimously approved the effort to combat a growing homelessness crisis. A divided crowd chanted, jeered...
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