Hurricane Harvey

FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 1, 2017 file photo, homes are surrounded by water from the flooded Brazos River in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Freeport, Texas. According to a study released on Wednesday, June 6, 2018, tropical cyclones around the world are moving slightly slower over land and water, dumping more rain as they stall, just as Hurricane Harvey did. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
June 06, 2018 - 1:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Tropical cyclones around the world are moving slightly slower over land and water, dumping more rain as they stall, just as Hurricane Harvey did last year, a new study found. This isn't about how powerful a storm's winds are, just how fast it chugs along. Storms in the last few...
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FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2017, file photo, a resident looks at debris piled in front of her home in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston. Officials in the Texas county hardest hit by Hurricane Harvey voted on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, to request that an August special election be set for a bond referendum in which residents could be asked to approve as much as $2.5 billion to finance critical flood-control projects. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
May 01, 2018 - 9:22 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Officials in the Texas county hardest hit by Hurricane Harvey voted on Tuesday to request that an August special election be set for a bond referendum in which residents could be asked to approve as much as $2.5 billion to finance critical flood-control projects. The proposed Aug. 25...
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April 27, 2018 - 1:07 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Advocacy groups say Texas is poised to unfairly distribute $5-plus billion in federal funding provided for housing repairs following Hurricane Harvey — prioritizing wealthy homeowners over poorer victims in ways that could constitute racial discrimination. A draft state...
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April 10, 2018 - 1:00 pm
FINANCIAL MARKETS Stocks rally NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are sharply higher in midday trading on Wall Street after conciliatory remarks on trade from China's leader helped put investors in a buying mood. Automakers and technology stocks climbed after President Xi Jinping (shee jihn-peeng) said he...
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Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, right, watches a volunteer take a selfie with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, left, in front of a Habitat for Humanity home, Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Houston. The subdivision Prince Mohammed toured Saturday is made up of Habitat for Humanity homes that were flooded a year earlier. Volunteers from the U.S.-based subsidiary of Saudi Aramco, the state-owned oil company of Saudi Arabia, had helped residents in the neighborhood clean up after the storm damage. (Steve Gonzales/Houston Chronicle via AP)
April 07, 2018 - 8:57 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has toured a Houston neighborhood that was devastated by Hurricane Harvey. The subdivision Prince Mohammed toured Saturday is made up of Habitat for Humanity homes that were flooded last year. The crown prince is wrapping up a marathon tour of...
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Construction workers help excavate and widen Brays Bayou as part of a nearly $500 million flood control project Thursday, March 22, 2018, in Houston. The project, which will widen 21 miles of the bayou and build stormwater detention basins, has proceeded in fits and starts for more than 20 years due to inconsistent funding. The project is one of several large-scale flood control projects Houston-area officials are hoping to fully fund and build thanks to billions of federal dollars that have been allocated to pay for flood mitigation efforts in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
March 24, 2018 - 4:44 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Large-scale projects long considered essential to easing Houston's flooding woes went to the top of the area's to-do list after Hurricane Harvey inundated large swaths of the nation's fourth-largest city. Seven months later, local officials are still looking for funding to undertake...
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In this Jan. 24, 2018 photo, Galena Park is hemmed in by heavy industry just east of downtown Houston along the ship channel. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)
March 23, 2018 - 7:22 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A toxic onslaught from the nation's petrochemical hub was largely overshadowed by the record-shattering deluge of Hurricane Harvey as residents and first responders struggled to save lives and property. More than a half-year after floodwaters swamped America's fourth-largest city,...
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In this Jan. 24, 2018 photo, Jessica Chastain talks about the flooding and chemical spills in her Galena Park neighborhood during and after Hurricane Harvey. The Houston neighborhood is a block away from chemical plants. A number of Harvey-related spills occurred near Chastain's home, including the 460,000-gallon gasoline spill at a Magellan Midstream Partners tank farm and nearly 52,000 pounds of crude oil from a Seaway Crude Pipeline Inc. tank. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)
March 22, 2018 - 6:57 am
HOUSTON (AP) — More than a half-year after Hurricane Harvey flooded America's largest corridor of energy and petrochemical plants, records show the storm's environmental assault was more widespread and severe than authorities publicly acknowledged. Piecing together county, state and federal records...
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In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, the Arkema chemical plant is flooded from Hurricane Harvey in Crosby, Texas, northeast of Houston. Nearby residents complain of a 'bitter taste' about the sparse information authorities provided when chemicals at the plant caught fire. They say the company failed to provide sufficient warning beforehand while environmental officials misled them with assurances that the air and water were safe. Critics say testing by authorities and contractors was inadequate to determine whether public health was threatened. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)
March 22, 2018 - 6:49 am
CROSBY, Texas (AP) — The skeleton crew at Arkema's chemical plant knew it was time to go by the morning of Aug. 29. Flooding from Hurricane Harvey had knocked out power. Thousands of gallons of chemical-laden water had spilled into the floodwaters. Soon, the company's stores of volatile organic...
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In this undated photo provided by NASA, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, waitin for liftoff on Thursday, March 1, 2018, is rolled to Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. GOES-S is the second satellite in an approximately $11 billion effort that’s already revolutionizing forecasting with astonishingly fast, crisp images of hurricanes, wildfires, floods, mudslides and other natural calamities. (Ben Smegelsky/NASA via AP)
March 02, 2018 - 10:50 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA launched another of the world's most advanced weather satellites on Thursday, this time to safeguard the western U.S. The GOES-S satellite thundered toward orbit aboard an Atlas V rocket, slicing through a hazy late afternoon sky. Dozens of meteorologists gathered...
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