Immunizations

FILE - This March 1931 file photo shows ampules of the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis in a laboratory at the Institute Pasteur in Paris, France. Dec. 2, 1947 file photo. Scientists are dusting off some decades-old vaccines against TB and polio to see if they could provide stopgap protection against COVID-19 until a more precise shot arrives. (AP Photo/Alfred Eisenstaedt)
April 13, 2020 - 4:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are dusting off some decades-old vaccines against other germs to see if they could provide a little stopgap protection against COVID-19 until a more precise shot arrives. It may sound odd: Vaccines are designed to target a specific disease. But vaccines made using live...
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In this image provided by the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville, Mitch McConnell sits with his parents, Julia "Dean" and A.M. McConnell in this image from the mid 1940's in Five Points, Ala. As the coronavirus pandemic unfolds, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell flashes back to an earlier crisis that gripped the nation, and his own life, when he was a boy. He was struck with polio. (McConnell Center at the University of Louisville via AP)
April 10, 2020 - 2:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitch McConnell’s earliest childhood memory is the day he left the polio treatment center at Warm Springs, Georgia, for the last time. He was just a toddler in 1944, when his father was deployed to World War II, his mother relocated the family to her sister’s home in rural Alabama...
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In this Wednesday, April 8, 2020 photo provided by the Center for Pharmaceutical Research, a participant in a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine trial receives an injection in Kansas City, Mo. This early safety study, called a Phase 1 trial, is using a vaccine candidate developed by Inovio Pharmaceuticals. (Center for Pharmaceutical Research via AP)
April 08, 2020 - 7:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers have opened another safety test of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine, this one using a skin-deep shot instead of the usual deeper jab. The pinch should feel like a simple skin test, a researcher told the volunteer lying on an exam table in Kansas City, Missouri, on...
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An NYPD traffic officer wearing personal protective equipment directs vehicles at a barricade after the city closed down a section of Bushwick Avenue due to COVID-19 concerns, Friday, March 27, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
April 06, 2020 - 9:33 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — China is reporting no coronavirus deaths over last...
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April 06, 2020 - 8:51 am
A second U.S. company is poised to begin a small safety test of a vaccine against the new coronavirus. Inovio Pharmaceuticals said Monday that it has Food and Drug Administration permission for the study in 40 healthy volunteers in Philadelphia and Kansas City, Missouri. The study is a first step...
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April 02, 2020 - 5:35 am
LONDON (AP) — Health officials attempting to eradicate polio say they are being forced to suspend their mass immunization efforts amid the surging coronavirus pandemic. The World Health Organization and partners decided that for the next six months, all polio activities including national...
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A women beats a cooking top in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, March 20, 2020 during the 'Switzerland says thank you' campaign to thank paramedics who fight against the new coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some it can cause more severe illness. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)
March 27, 2020 - 6:05 pm
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization’s emergencies chief said Friday that widespread testing for the new coronavirus is crucial and countries should not be faulted for reporting higher numbers of cases. He also appealed for a shift toward public health strategies that allow us “to live with...
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FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2018, file photo, the Department of Justice seal is seen in Washington, D.C. An internet firm is ending the automated registration of website names that include words or phrases related to the COVID-19 pandemic, in an attempt to combat coronavirus-related fraud. Los Angeles-based Namecheap Inc. made the pledge after a federal judge in Texas on Sunday, March 22, 2020, ordered the takedown of a website the U.S. Department of Justice accused of stealing credit card information while offering fake coronavirus vaccine kits. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
March 26, 2020 - 6:31 pm
BOSTON (AP) — An internet firm is ending the automated registration of website names that include words or phrases related to the COVID-19 pandemic, an attempt to combat coronavirus-related fraud. Los Angeles-based Namecheap Inc. made the pledge after a federal judge in Texas ordered the takedown...
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In this photo released by Saudi Press Agency, SPA, Saudi King Salman, chairs a video call of world leaders from the Group of 20 and other international bodies and organizations, from his office in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, March 26, 2020. The meeting is aimed at coordinating the global response to the fast-spreading coronavirus, which has shuttered businesses and forced well over a quarter of the world's population into home isolation. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)
March 26, 2020 - 6:01 pm
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The head of the United Nations told leaders of the world’s 20 major industrialized nations during an emergency virtual summit Thursday that "we are at war with a virus — and not winning it” despite dramatic measures by countries to seal their borders, shutter...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2020, file photo, Dr. Zhou Min, a recovered COVID-19 patient who has passed his 14-day quarantine, donates plasma in the city's blood center in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients contains antibodies that may help reduce the viral load in patients that are fighting the disease. (Chinatopix via AP, File)
March 24, 2020 - 11:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hospitals are gearing up to test if a century-old treatment used to fight off flu and measles outbreaks in the days before vaccines, and tried more recently against SARS and Ebola, just might work for COVID-19, too: using blood donated from patients who’ve recovered. Doctors in...
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