Infectious diseases

November 14, 2019 - 2:21 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Germany's parliament has passed a law requiring that children who attend school or daycare must be vaccinated for measles. Lawmakers approved the government’s bill Thursday with a majority of 459 in favor, 89 against and 105 abstentions. The law means parents who can't prove their...
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FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2009 file photo, chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa. China reopened its market to U.S. poultry, ending a five-year ban. China had blocked U.S. poultry imports after an outbreak of avian influenza in December 2014, closing off a market that bought more than $500 million worth of American chicken, turkey and other poultry products in 2013. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
November 14, 2019 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — China is lifting a five-year ban on U.S. poultry, a goodwill gesture at a time when the world’s two biggest economies are trying to finalize a tentative trade deal. China had blocked U.S. poultry imports a month after an outbreak of avian influenza in December 2014, closing off a...
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In this Aug. 20, 2019 file photo, a relative embraces a young patient receiving treatment for dengue at the University School Hospital in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. In an international report released on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, doctors say children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents had. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
November 14, 2019 - 1:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Children are growing up in a warmer world that will hit them with more and different health problems than their parents experienced, an international report by doctors said. With increasing diarrhea diseases, more dangerous heat waves, air pollution and increases in mosquito-borne...
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This 1971 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, which causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. In a report released Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated about 36,000 Americans died from drug-resistant infections in 2017 _ down about 18% from an estimated 44,000 in 2013. Though deaths may be going down, non-fatal infections increased nationally from 2013 to 2017, from 2.6 million to 2.8 million. Dramatic increases in drug-resistant gonorrhea, urinary tract infections, and group A strep were largely to blame. (CDC via AP)
November 13, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Drug-resistant “superbug” infections have been called a developing nightmare that could set medicine back a century, making conquered germs once again untreatable. So there’s some surprising news in a report released Wednesday: U.S. superbug deaths appear to be going down. About 36,...
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FILE - This Nov. 20, 2018 file photo shows Romaine Lettuce in Simi Valley, Calif. Health officials are disclosing another E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from the summer 2019, but say it appears to be over. The disclosure comes after romaine producers pledged to step up safety measures following a series of outbreaks, including one last year that sickened more than 200 and killed five. Experts say it’s not clear why romaine keeps getting tainted. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
November 01, 2019 - 4:43 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials disclosed another food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, but they said it appears to be over. The disclosure late Thursday comes after the produce industry said it was stepping up safety measures following a series of outbreaks , including one last...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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October 30, 2019 - 7:24 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says more than 7 million cases of malaria have been reported in Burundi this year. Officials blame the outbreak on factors including the lack of protective bed nets, problems with medicines and climate change. The U.N. health agency says malaria has...
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This 1966 image made available by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention shows a chest x-ray of a tuberculosis patient. According to results reported Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019 at a conference in India and published by the New England Journal of Medicine, an experimental vaccine has proved 50% effective at preventing latent tuberculosis infection from turning into active disease in a three-year study of adults in Africa. (CDC via AP)
October 29, 2019 - 6:43 am
An experimental vaccine proved 50% effective at preventing latent tuberculosis infection from turning into active disease in a three-year study of adults in Africa. Doctors were encouraged because protection declined only a little after two years, and even a partially effective vaccine would be a...
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FILE -- In this Jan. 25 , 2002 file photo, a Congolese child is given a polio vaccination at a relief camp near Gisenyi, Rwanda. The World Health Organization says Zambia has reported its first local case of polio since 1995 in a 2-year-old boy paralysed by a virus derived from the vaccine. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
October 23, 2019 - 7:47 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says Zambia has reported its first local case of polio since 1995, in a 2-year-old boy paralyzed by a virus derived from the vaccine. In a report this week, WHO said the case was detected on the border with Congo, which has reported 37 cases of polio...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The poliolike syndrome, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, is very rare. Since the first reports from California in...
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