Infectious diseases

A child plays in a puddle at a camp for displaced survivors of cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique,Tuesday, April, 2, 2019. Mozambican and international health workers raced Monday to contain a cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit city of Beira and surrounding areas, where the number of cases has jumped to more than 1,000. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
April 02, 2019 - 11:05 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in cyclone-hit Mozambique have risen above 1,400, government officials said Tuesday, as hundreds of thousands of vaccine doses arrived in an attempt to limit the rapid spread of the disease. Authorities announced a second death from cholera, which causes acute...
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A woman fetches water from an unprotected source in Beira, Mozambique, Sunday, March, 31, 2019. Cholera cases among cyclone survivors in Mozambique have jumped to 271, authorities said. So far no cholera deaths have been confirmed, the report said. Another Lusa report said the death toll in central Mozambique from the cyclone that hit on March 14 had inched up to 501. Authorities have warned the toll is highly preliminary as flood waters recede and reveal more bodies. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
April 01, 2019 - 3:48 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Mozambican and international health workers raced Monday to contain a cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit city of Beira and surrounding areas, where the number of cases has jumped to more than 1,000. One person has died of cholera, while 97 patients remain in treatment...
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FILE - This Wednesday, March 27, 2019 file photo shows a sign explaining the local state of emergency because of a measles outbreak at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Measles is spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It's so contagious that 90 percent of people who aren't immunized are infected if exposed to the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
April 01, 2019 - 11:37 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The number of U.S. measles cases through the first three months of this year have surpassed the count for all of 2018, health officials say. There have been 387 cases through March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday. There were 372 last year. The numbers...
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Community members assist a doctor carrying boxes with medical supplies as he runs towards the South African Defence Forces helicopter after assisting a community affected by a cyclone near Beira, Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 29, 2019 - 4:03 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in Mozambique among survivors of a devastating cyclone have shot up to 139, officials said, as nearly 1 million vaccine doses were rushed to the region and health workers desperately tried to improvise treatment space for victims. Cholera causes acute diarrhea, is...
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FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2012 file photo, a farm worker carries heads of romaine lettuce in a field near Holtville, Calif. In a Nov. 15, 2018 email, James Gorny, a senior science adviser for produce safety at the FDA, wrote that growers “cannot cling to their generic E. coli monitoring standard,” which he called “unacceptable.” The message came five days before the FDA made public another outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, and after a separate outbreak earlier in the year sickened more than 200 and killed five. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
March 29, 2019 - 2:51 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After repeated food poisoning outbreaks tied to romaine lettuce, a U.S. food safety official shared his concerns in an internal email, saying the produce industry's water testing "failed in an epic and tragic way." How the industry tests water to grow leafy greens is "unacceptable"...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 12:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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In this image made from video provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine, Nina Martinez of Atlanta is wheeled into a Baltimore operating room to become who is thought to be the world’s first kidney transplant living donor with HIV, on Monday, March 25, 2019. Martinez, 35, donated a kidney to an HIV-positive stranger, saying she "wanted to make a difference in somebody else's life" and counter the stigma that too often still surrounds HIV infection. (Johns Hopkins Medicine via AP)
March 28, 2019 - 3:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Surgeons in Baltimore have performed what's thought to be the world's first kidney transplant from a living donor with HIV, a milestone for people with the AIDS virus — and one that could free up space on the transplant waiting list for everyone. Nina Martinez of Atlanta traveled...
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FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2018, file photo, a healthcare worker from the World Health Organization gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. One-fourth of the people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study released Wednesday, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are now facing. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, File)
March 28, 2019 - 5:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — One out of four people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are facing in what has become the second-deadliest outbreak in history. The survey released late...
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FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2016, file photo, Anna Dragsbaek, president and CEO of The Immunization Partnership, holds up a copy of the nonprofit's report on the status of vaccinations in Texas during a news conference at the Capitol in Austin, Texas. Nearly 50 people in the Texas Capitol received booster shots after a whooping cough scare on the House floor, bringing immunization battles close to home in a chamber where politically active anti-vaccination groups have moved to claim territory. (Deborah Cannon/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
March 27, 2019 - 7:18 pm
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Nearly 50 people who work at the Texas Capitol have been vaccinated this week because a page contracted whooping cough, a health scare that comes as legislatures around the country grapple with rising immunization exemptions and recent measles outbreaks. Texas health officials...
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Steve Sierzega receives a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y., Wednesday, March 27, 2019. The county in New York City's northern suburbs declared a local state of emergency Tuesday over a measles outbreak that has infected more than 150 people since last fall, hoping a ban against unvaccinated children in public places wakes their parents to the seriousness of the problem. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
March 27, 2019 - 6:36 pm
NEW CITY, N.Y. (AP) — Some parents who had resisted having their children vaccinated have reluctantly brought them in for a measles shot as a state of emergency took effect in a county in New York City's northern suburbs. Rockland County enacted the emergency order Tuesday night to fight a measles...
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