Injuries

FILE - In this April 8, 2019, file photo, a woman browses her smartphone in Philadelphia. Accidental cuts and bruises to the face, head and neck from cellphones are sending increasing numbers of Americans to the emergency room, according to a study that estimates 76,000 cases over nine years. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
December 05, 2019 - 11:40 am
Add facial cuts, bruises and fractures to the risks from cellphones and carelessly using them. That's according to a study published Thursday that found a spike in U.S. emergency room treatment for these mostly minor injuries. The research was led by a facial plastic surgeon whose patients include...
Read More
November 28, 2019 - 8:22 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — For several years now, it has been almost de rigueur for skiers and snowboarders to strap on a helmet amid rising concerns about safety on the slopes. But a new study caution that helmets cannot protect skiers from all head injuries. Two trauma surgeons studied data of...
Read More
Denver Nuggets center Nikola Jokic, left, looks to pass the ball as Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart defends during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Nov. 22, 2019, in Denver. The Nuggets won 96-92. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
November 23, 2019 - 1:30 am
DENVER (AP) — Jamal Murray's strong finish helped the Denver Nuggets work their way through a stretch of ragged play. His thoughts after the game turned to an injured opponent. Murray scored 22 points, including two clutch free throws with 1.5 seconds remaining, and the Nuggets hung on to beat the...
Read More
FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, file photo, a technician releases mosquitoes that are infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria called "Wolbachia" in the Tubiacanga neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The nonprofit World Mosquito Program infected mosquitoes with that bacteria, called Wolbachia, and released them in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that agreed to be test sites. Researchers say dengue cases fell dramatically, compared to nearby communities where regular mosquitoes did the biting. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)
November 21, 2019 - 4:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that are buzzing with the specially bred...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2019 file photo, an anti-government protester injured during clashes with police is placed into the backseat of a car in Valparaiso, Chile. In less than a month, more than 230 Chileans have lost sight in one eye, mostly due to the impact of pellets fired by the police during clashes with protesters demanding greater equality and improved social services. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix, File)
November 14, 2019 - 8:43 pm
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Chileans are accustomed to seeing violent clashes between police and demonstrators but a new trend is leaving them shaken: the blinding of protesters by shotgun pellets fired by state’s security agents. Chile’s main medical body says at least 230 people have lost sight after...
Read More
In this Aug. 23, 2019, photo, a Honduran father stands at his home in Comayagua, Honduras, after talking in an interview about being separated from his 3-year-old daughter at the border after traveling for weeks to seek asylum in the U.S. According to court records, his daughter was sexually abused in U.S. foster care. She was later deported and arrived back in Honduras withdrawn, anxious and angry. He fears their bond is forever broken. (AP Photo/Elmer Martinez)
AP News
November 12, 2019 - 11:33 am
COMAYAGUA, Honduras (AP) — The 3-year-old girl traveled for weeks cradled in her father's arms, as he set out to seek asylum in the United States. Now she won't even look at him. After being forcibly separated at the border by government officials, sexually abused in U.S. foster care and deported,...
Read More
Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, second from right, and former first lady Rosalynn Carter sit as admiring guests Romona Kluth, left, and husband Doug Kluth, both from Nebraska, finish their turn of having their photo made with them, after Jimmy taught Sunday school at Maranatha Baptist Church, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, in Plains, Ga. (AP Photo/John Amis)
November 03, 2019 - 7:42 pm
PLAINS, Ga. (AP) — Former President Jimmy Carter taught a Bible lesson on life after death Sunday less than two weeks after breaking his pelvis in a fall. Using a walker, the 95-year-old Democrat slowly entered the crowded sanctuary at Maranatha Baptist Church in the southwest Georgia town of...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Cook County Jail in Grand Marais, Minn., shows Mark Pavelich. The family of Pavelich, a player on the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" Olympic champion men's hockey team, believes concussions and blows he received during his playing career have contributed to his current legal troubles. A Minnesota judge Monday, Oct. 28, 2019, found him incompetent to stand trial on charges he beat a neighbor with a metal pole. (Cook County Jail via AP)
October 29, 2019 - 12:23 pm
GRAND MARAIS, Minn. (AP) — The family of a player on the 1980 "Miracle on Ice" Olympic champion men's hockey team says concussions and blows he received during his playing career have contributed to his current legal troubles. Mark Pavelich, 61, was found incompetent to stand trial by a judge in...
Read More
October 24, 2019 - 2:25 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Former President Jimmy Carter is out of the hospital where he was treated after fracturing his pelvis in a recent fall at his home, a spokeswoman said Thursday. Carter Center spokeswoman Deanna Congileo said in a statement that the former president had been released from Phoebe...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
October 21, 2019 - 12:53 pm
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
Read More

Pages