Intelligence agencies

A man walks past the building of the Russian military intelligence service in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, July 14, 2018. U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday scolded the Obama administration for not responding aggressively enough to Russian hacking of Democratic targets in the 2016 U.S. election — cyberattacks underpinning the indictment of 12 Russian military intelligence officers. Trump's first response to special counsel Robert Mueller's initial charges against Russian government officials for interfering in American politics came in tweets the president posted while at his golf resort in Scotland, two days before a high-stakes summit in Finland with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
July 17, 2018 - 5:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Exactly seven months before the 2016 presidential election, Russian government hackers made it onto a Democratic committee's network. One of their carefully crafted fraudulent emails had hit pay dirt, enticing an employee to click a link and enter her password. That breach of the...
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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., criticizes President Donald Trump's performance during his side-by-side news conference with Russia's Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, July 16, 2018. Trump openly questioned his own intelligence agencies' conclusions that Moscow was to blame for meddling in the 2016 U.S. election to Trump's benefit. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 17, 2018 - 12:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Bizarre." ''Shameful." ''Disgraceful." That's the swift and sweeping condemnation directed at President Donald Trump on Monday after he sided with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a stunning appearance in Helsinki — and that's just from the Republicans. Lawmakers in both...
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A man walks past the building of the Russian military intelligence service in Moscow, Russia, Saturday, July 14, 2018. U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday scolded the Obama administration for not responding aggressively enough to Russian hacking of Democratic targets in the 2016 U.S. election — cyberattacks underpinning the indictment of 12 Russian military intelligence officers. Trump's first response to special counsel Robert Mueller's initial charges against Russian government officials for interfering in American politics came in tweets the president posted while at his golf resort in Scotland, two days before a high-stakes summit in Finland with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
July 16, 2018 - 10:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Exactly seven months before the 2016 presidential election, Russian government hackers made it onto a Democratic committee's network. One of their carefully crafted fraudulent emails had hit pay dirt, enticing an employee to click a link and enter her password. That breach of the...
Read More
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., criticizes President Donald Trump's performance during his side-by-side news conference with Russia's Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, July 16, 2018. Trump openly questioned his own intelligence agencies' conclusions that Moscow was to blame for meddling in the 2016 U.S. election to Trump's benefit. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 16, 2018 - 10:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Bizarre." ''Shameful." ''Disgraceful." That's the swift and sweeping condemnation directed at President Donald Trump on Monday after he sided with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a stunning appearance in Helsinki — and that's just from the Republicans. Lawmakers in both...
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U.S. President Donald Trump, left, listens to Russian President Vladimir Putin during a press conference after their meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
July 16, 2018 - 7:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on reaction to President Donald Trump's news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin (all times local): 7:35 p.m. Australia's prime minister says he finds U.S. intelligence of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election "very compelling," and...
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July 12, 2018 - 6:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to authorize funding for intelligence agencies and support critical national security programs especially targeting Russia, China and North Korea, passed the House on Thursday. The bill, which passed 363-54, would increase the pay for intelligence employees with cyber...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Yolo County Sheriff's Office shows Thanh Cong Phan of Everett, Wash. A federal judge is expected to decide Thursday, July 12, 2018, whether a Washington state man accused of mailing explosive devices to government agencies in the Washington D.C. area is competent to participate in his court case and help in his defense. (Yolo County Sheriff's Office/The Herald via AP, File)
July 12, 2018 - 4:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A federal judge ruled Thursday that a Washington state man accused of mailing explosive devices to government agencies in the Washington, D.C., area is not competent to help with his defense and should receive treatment before his case moves forward. A competency evaluation for Thanh...
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This Sunday, July 1, 2018, photo provided by the North Olmsted Police Department in North Olmsted, Ohio, shows Demetrius Pitts, of Maple Heights, Ohio, who was charged with trying to support terrorism. Federal authorities say Pitts talked often about his support for al-Qaida and recently scouted locations in Cleveland to attack people watching Fourth of July fireworks. (North Olmsted Police Department via AP)
July 02, 2018 - 4:16 pm
An American-born citizen who federal authorities say recently scouted locations in Cleveland to attack people watching Fourth of July fireworks and talked of carrying out additional bombings has been charged with trying to support terrorism. Federal authorities said Monday that Demetrius Pitts had...
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FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013 file photo shows the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The agency released a statement late Thursday, June 28, 2018, saying it started deleting the records in May after NSA analysts noted "technical irregularities in some data received from telecommunication service providers." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
June 30, 2018 - 1:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The NSA's bulk collection of call records was...
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June 29, 2018 - 7:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The NSA's bulk collection of call records was...
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