Losing a job

Instacart worker Saori Okawa loads groceries into her car for home delivery on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in San Leandro, Calif. Okawa is one of an estimated 1.5 million so-called gig workers who make a living driving people to airports, picking out produce at grocery stores or providing childcare for working parents. But with the pandemic pummeling the global economy and U.S. unemployment reaching heights not seen since the Great Depression, gig workers are clamoring for jobs that often pay less while facing stiff competition from a crush of newly unemployed workers also attempting to patch together a livelihood until the economy recovers. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
July 05, 2020 - 12:34 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — There were the two-hour, unpaid waits outside supermarkets when San Francisco first started to lock down, on top of the heavy shopping bags that had to be lugged up countless flights of stairs. And yet even after signing up for several apps, 39-year-old Saori Okawa still wasn't...
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Shoppers, left, head to the entrance as a sign on the outside wall invites customers to shop inside a Best Buy store Wednesday, June 24, 2020 in Richfield, Minn. as restrictions due to the coronavirus have eased in Minnesota. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
June 26, 2020 - 10:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers increased their spending by a record 8.2% in May, partly erasing huge plunges the previous two months, against the backdrop of an economy that’s likely shrinking by its steepest pace on record this quarter. Last month's rebound in consumer spending followed...
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FILE - This file image provided by U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service shows the website for HealthCare.gov. Close to half a million people who lost their health insurance amid the economic shutdown to slow the spread of COVID-19 have gotten coverage through HealthCare.gov, the government reported Thursday, June 25, 2020. (U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service via AP, File)
June 26, 2020 - 10:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — As coronavirus cases rise in more than half of the states, the Trump administration is urging the Supreme Court to overturn the Affordable Care Act. The administration's high court filing at 10:30 p.m. Thursday came the same day the government reported that close to half a million...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2020, file a passer-by wears a mask out of concern for the coronavirus while walking past a storefront window in Boston. Eighty-five percent of Democrats call economic conditions “poor,” while 65% of Republicans describe them as “good,” according to a new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
June 22, 2020 - 8:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans' outlook on the national economy has improved somewhat from its lowest points during the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic, but a new poll suggests Democrats and Republicans are living in alternate economic realities amid the sharpest recession in the nation’s...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019, file photo, Aimee Stephens, seated center, and her wife Donna Stephens, in pink, listen during a news conference outside the Supreme Court in Washington. Aimee Stephens lost her job when she told Thomas Rost, owner of the Detroit-area R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, that she had struggled with gender identity issues almost her whole life. The Supreme Court has ruled that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment. It's a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. Laverne Cox, the award-winning transgender actress and longtime trans rights activist, listens at left. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
AP News
June 15, 2020 - 6:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights...
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FILE - In this May 20, 2020, file photo, signs that read "No Job No Rent" hang from the windows of an apartment building during the coronavirus pandemic in Northwest Washington. The pandemic has shut housing courts and prompted authorities around the U.S. to initiate policies protecting renters from eviction. But not everyone is covered, and some landlords are turning to threats and harassment to force tenants out. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
AP News
June 14, 2020 - 4:22 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — Jeremy Rooks works the evening shift at a Georgia fast-food restaurant these days to avoid being on the street past dusk. He needs somewhere to go at night: He and his wife are homeless after the extended-stay motel where they had lived since Thanksgiving evicted them in April when...
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In this photo taken Thursday, June 4, 2020, a pedestrian wearing a mask walks past reader board advertising a job opening for a remodeling company, in Seattle. The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 13.3% in May, and 2.5 million jobs were added — a surprisingly positive reading in the midst of a recession that has paralyzed the economy and depressed the job market in the wake of the viral pandemic. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
June 11, 2020 - 10:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — About 1.5 million laid-off workers applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week, evidence that many Americans are still losing their jobs even as the economy appears to be slowly recovering with more businesses partially reopening. The latest figure from the Labor Department...
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June 09, 2020 - 4:17 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico’s labor secretary resigned on Tuesday as tens of thousands of unemployed workers have yet to receive financial aid promised months ago amid a pandemic that has deepened the U.S. territory’s economic crisis. The anger directed at former secretary Briseida...
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FILE - In this May 11, 2020, file photo light shines in a patient pod at a temporary alternate care site constructed in response to the coronavirus outbreak inside the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington. People are still more likely to prefer the private sector than the government on driving innovation in health care, improving quality and, by a narrower margin, providing coverage, according to the survey by the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, FIle)
June 08, 2020 - 8:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pushed hospitals to the edge, and millions of workers lost job-based coverage in the economic shutdown to slow the spread, but a new poll suggests Americans have remarkably little interest in big changes to health care as a result of the pandemic. People are still...
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FILE - In this Thursday, March 19, 2020, file photo, a public school employee sanitizes a sink in a bathroom at a U.S. high school. Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services, from schools to trash pickup. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)
June 06, 2020 - 11:19 am
Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services — from schools to trash pickup. Even as the U.S. added some jobs in May, the number of...
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