Malaria

In this Sept. 9, 2019 photo, Emmanuel Bizimana holds 2-year-old Blessing, whose mother, Sandrine Umwungeri, passed away recently, as a health worker conducts a "verbal autopsy" in Kigali, Rwanda. Increasingly health officials worldwide are trusting these tools, which are analyzed by computer algorithms, to learn more about global course of human disease. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
October 01, 2019 - 9:03 am
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — One afternoon last month, a young woman with a tablet computer sat next to Alphonsine Umurerwa on the living room couch, asking questions, listening carefully. She learned that the woman's 23-year-old daughter, Sandrine Umwungeri, had been very sick for about a year, gradually...
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A health worker vaccinates a child against malaria in Homabay County, western Kenya, Friday Sept.13, 2019. The vaccine is the world's first for malaria and has been rolled out in Kenya, Ghana, and Malawi by the World Health Organisation. (AP Photo/Joseph Oduor)
September 13, 2019 - 2:39 pm
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Health authorities in Kenya on Friday started administering doses of the world's only licensed malaria vaccine to young children in rural areas facing high transmission rates. Kenya became the third African country to introduce the vaccine, after Malawi and Ghana. The aim is...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby receiving a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The World Health Organization said Thursday Aug. 22, 2019, it’s theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the flawed vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
August 23, 2019 - 4:51 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says it's theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the imperfect vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. Dr. Pedro Alonso, the U.N. health agency's global malaria director, said WHO is "unequivocally in favor"...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby receiving a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The World Health Organization said Thursday Aug. 22, 2019, it’s theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the flawed vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
August 22, 2019 - 8:17 pm
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says it's theoretically possible to wipe out malaria, but probably not with the flawed vaccine and other control methods being used at the moment. Dr. Pedro Alonso, the U.N. health agency's global malaria director, said WHO is "unequivocably in favor" of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2009 file photo, a mother holds her baby receiving a new malaria vaccine as part of a trial at the Walter Reed Project Research Center in Kombewa in Western Kenya. The World Health Organization said Tuesday April 23, 2019, that Malawi has become the first country to introduce a pilot program vaccinating children against malaria using the only licensed vaccine to protect against the mosquito-spread disease. Although the vaccine only protects about one third of children who are immunized, those who get the shot are likely to have less severe cases of malaria. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
April 23, 2019 - 3:52 pm
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says Malawi has become the first country to begin immunizing children against malaria, using the only licensed vaccine to protect against the mosquito-spread disease. Although the vaccine only protects about one-third of children who are immunized, those...
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A woman fetches water from an unprotected source in Beira, Mozambique, Sunday, March, 31, 2019. Cholera cases among cyclone survivors in Mozambique have jumped to 271, authorities said. So far no cholera deaths have been confirmed, the report said. Another Lusa report said the death toll in central Mozambique from the cyclone that hit on March 14 had inched up to 501. Authorities have warned the toll is highly preliminary as flood waters recede and reveal more bodies. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
April 01, 2019 - 3:48 pm
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Mozambican and international health workers raced Monday to contain a cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit city of Beira and surrounding areas, where the number of cases has jumped to more than 1,000. One person has died of cholera, while 97 patients remain in treatment...
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November 19, 2018 - 8:56 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The World Health Organization says progress in reducing the number of people contracting malaria has stalled after several years of global declines. The WHO said Monday that there were about 219 million cases of malaria in 2017, up 2 million from the previous year. In contrast,...
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September 13, 2018 - 7:24 am
LUCKNOW, India (AP) — Indian health authorities are rushing medical supplies to north Indian towns and villages where at least 50 people have died from fever over the past two weeks, topping the number of fever-related deaths over a three-month period last year. Patients suffering from fever and...
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FILE - This April 28, 2010, file photo shows the GlaxoSmithKline offices in London. On Friday, July 20, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved GlaxoSmithKline’s Krintafel, a simpler, one-dose treatment, to prevent relapses of malaria. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
July 20, 2018 - 5:58 pm
U.S. regulators have approved a simpler, one-dose treatment to prevent relapses of malaria. Standard treatment takes two weeks and many patients don't finish taking all the doses. Malaria is caused by parasites that are spread through mosquito bites. The parasites can remain dormant in the liver...
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In this Feb. 1, 2012 file photo, Prof. Peter Seeberger, a former Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor poses with a molecule model at his laboratory in Berlin, Germany. Scientists in Germany who developed a new way to make a key malaria drug several years ago said Wednesday Feb. 21, 2018 they have come up with a technique to make the process even more efficient, which should increase global access and reduce the cost. “This development has the potentiation to save millions of lives by increasing the global access and reducing the cost of anti-malaria medicine,” Peter Seeberger, director of the Max Planck Institute unit working on the issue. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber,file)
February 21, 2018 - 10:34 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists in Germany who developed a new way to make a key malaria drug several years ago said Wednesday they have come up with a technique to make the process even more efficient, which should increase global access and reduce the cost. The new procedure refines a method developed...
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