Malaria

Abebe Shibru, Marie Stopes International Country Director for Zimbabwe speaks to the Associated Press in Harare, Tuesday, Jan, 23, 2018, where the heath system is in tatters amid a plummeting economy, and Marie Stopes used to treat at least 150,000 women per year, but now its outreach sites are cut in half because of funding problems. US President Donald Trump's dramatic expansion of a ban on U.S. funding to foreign organizations that provide abortions has left impoverished women around the world without treatment for HIV, malaria and other diseases, health groups say.(AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
January 23, 2018 - 12:33 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — President Donald Trump's dramatic expansion of a ban on U.S. funding to foreign organizations that promote or provide abortions has left impoverished women around the world without treatment for HIV, malaria and other diseases, health groups say, calling it "devastating" because...
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FILE - In this Thursday, July 21, 2016 file photo, residents of the Kisenso district receive yellow fever vaccines, in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. The World Health Organization says that about 11 percent of medicines in developing countries are fake _ and potentially responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of children from diseases like malaria and pneumonia. In the U.N. health agency’s first attempt to assess the problem, experts reviewed 100 papers, involving more than 48,000 medicines. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
November 28, 2017 - 12:32 pm
LONDON (AP) — About 11 percent of medicines in developing countries are counterfeit and likely responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of children from diseases like malaria and pneumonia every year, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. It's the first attempt by the U.N. health...
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This microscope image provided by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows genetically modified mosquito larvae glowing with fluorescent markers. Mosquitoes harbor gut bacteria just like people do, and new research suggests the bugs inside the bugs may help scientists learn to hatch malaria-resistant mosquitoes. (Dr. Yuemei Dong, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health via AP)
September 28, 2017 - 2:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Mosquitoes harbor gut bacteria just like people do — and the bugs inside the bugs may hold a key to fighting malaria. Today, bed nets and insecticides are the chief means of preventing malaria, which sickens about 200 million people around the world and kills 400,000 a year,...
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September 20, 2017 - 10:08 pm
HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Vietnam's main malaria treatment is failing at an alarming rate because of a highly drug-resistant superbug that has spread into the southern part of the country from western Cambodia, scientists said Thursday. In their letter published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases...
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September 05, 2017 - 11:57 am
ROME (AP) — Italy's health ministry has ordered an investigation into the death of a 4-year-old girl from malaria after checks determined she hadn't traveled to any country at risk for the disease. The child died Monday at the Brescia public hospital after being transferred from Trento. Italy is...
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FILE - A Wednesday, May 24, 2017 file photo showing Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), answering questions from journalists at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. The new head of the World Health Organization said he is reviewing the agency's travel expenses, after an Associated Press story last month revealed the U.N. agency spends more on travel than on fighting AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP, File)
July 07, 2017 - 8:23 am
LONDON (AP) — The new head of the World Health Organization said he is reviewing the agency's travel expenses, after an Associated Press story revealed the U.N. agency spends more on travel than on fighting AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Ethiopia's former health minister, Tedros Adhanom...
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FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2016 file photo, a girl uses binoculars to watch the North side at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea. A South Korean civic group said Monday, June 5, 2017, that North Korea has rejected its offer to provide anti-malaria supplies to protest Seoul's support of fresh U.N. sanctions on the country. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man. File)
June 05, 2017 - 11:58 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean civic group which offered to provide anti-malarial supplies to North Korea said Monday the North has rejected its proposal because of the South's support of new U.N. sanctions. The rejection could complicate efforts by South Korea's new liberal President...
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June 05, 2017 - 4:32 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean civic group says North Korea has rejected its offer to provide anti-malaria supplies to protest Seoul's support of fresh U.N. sanctions on the country. The rejection could complicate efforts by South Korea's news liberal President Moon Jae-in to try to...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016 file photo, a visitor uses binoculars to see the North Korean territory from the unification observatory in Paju, South Korea. South Korea approved Friday, May 26, 2017, a civic group to contact North Korea over aid programs, the first such approval since North Korea's nuclear test in January 2016. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man. File)
May 26, 2017 - 4:18 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea will allow a civic group to contact North Korea over help in fighting malaria, the first government approval on cross-border civilian exchanges since North Korea's fourth nuclear test in January 2016, officials said Friday. The announcement is a sign that the...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016 file photo, a visitor uses binoculars to see the North Korean territory from the unification observatory in Paju, South Korea. South Korea approved Friday, May 26, 2017, a civic group to contact North Korea over aid programs, the first such approval since North Korea's nuclear test in January 2016. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man. File)
May 26, 2017 - 1:52 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea will allow a civic group to contact North Korea over help in fighting malaria, the first government approval on cross-border civilian exchanges since North Korea's fourth nuclear test in January 2016, officials said Friday. The announcement is a sign that the...
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