Medical research

FILE - In this June 7, 2008 file photo, a woman evaluates the aroma of a wine in California. On Friday, June 15, 2018, National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins announced the NIH is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, citing ethical problems that would undermine the credibility of its findings. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
June 15, 2018 - 8:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility. The National Institutes of Health used money from the alcohol...
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FILE - This June 8, 2007 file photo shows a glass of milk on a table during a family breakfast in Montgomery, Ala. Nearly 20 years ago, about nearly half of high school students said they drank at least one glass of milk a day. But now it’s down to less than a third, according to a survey released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, June 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Rob Carr)
June 14, 2018 - 7:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer U.S. teens are smoking, having sex and doing drugs these days. Oh, and they're drinking less milk, too. Less than one-third of high school students drink a glass of milk a day, according to a large government survey released Thursday. About two decades ago, it was nearly half...
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June 06, 2018 - 11:53 am
BOSTON (AP) — Boston University is pairing with Johnson & Johnson to help fight lung cancer. School officials announced Wednesday the company will pay for a new lung center at the university where researchers will work to prevent and cure the disease. It's part of a five-year research...
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Graphic lists post positions for horses in the Belmont Stakes; 2c x 3 1/2 inches; 96.3 mm x 88 mm;
June 06, 2018 - 9:07 am
Mike Smith knows the feeling. A headache. Maybe some dizziness. As a younger jockey he got concussions, felt better and went back to riding. "I've had several," Smith said. "It's just like you hit your head playing any sport." Smith is currently in the international spotlight as he goes for the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2003, file photo, Rep. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, D-Decatur, promotes the breast cancer prevention stamp from the well on the floor of the House in Atlanta. Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp enabled a landmark study that showed which women need chemo and which do not. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
June 04, 2018 - 4:58 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Countless breast cancer patients in the future will be spared millions of dollars of chemotherapy thanks in part to something that millions of Americans did that cost them just pennies: bought a postage stamp. Proceeds from the U.S. Postal Service's breast cancer stamp put...
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This undated microscope image from USC via the NIH shows pancreatic cancer cells, nuclei in blue, growing as a sphere encased in membranes, red. In a rare triumph for tough-to-beat pancreatic cancer, patients who had surgery lived substantially longer on a four-drug combo than on a standard cancer drug, according to research released on Monday, June 4, 2018. (Min Yu/Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center)
June 04, 2018 - 11:11 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Patients with pancreatic cancer that hadn't spread lived substantially longer on a four-drug combo than on a single standard cancer drug, a rare advance for a tough-to-treat disease, researchers reported Monday. The results indicate the powerful chemotherapy treatment known as...
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In this Thursday, May 24, 2018 photo, Adine Usher, 78, meets with breast cancer study leader Dr. Joseph Sparano at the Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx borough of New York. Usher was one of about 10,000 participants in the study which shows women at low or intermediate risk for breast cancer recurrence may safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of survival. (AP Photo/Kathy Young)
June 04, 2018 - 1:17 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk. The study is the largest ever done...
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Westley Sholes, 78, a retired health care manager poses for a picture at his home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., on Wednesday, May 30, 2018. Results from his first prostate cancer scan were suspicious and the second done three months later detected early cancer. That was 20 years ago; Sholes had surgery and is doing well. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
June 01, 2018 - 5:35 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Black men with advanced prostate cancer fared surprisingly well in two new studies that challenge current thinking about racial disparities in the disease. Blacks are more likely to get prostate cancer and to die from it than whites, but the new research suggests getting access to...
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This undated microscope image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows human colon cancer cells with the cell nuclei stained red. According to new American Cancer Society guidelines released on Wednesday, May 30, 2018, most U.S. adults should begin getting screened for colon cancer when they turn 45. (NCI Center for Cancer Research/NIH via AP)
May 30, 2018 - 10:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — New guidelines released Wednesday recommend U.S. adults start colon cancer screening earlier, at age 45 instead of 50. The American Cancer Society's advice puts it out of sync with guidelines from an influential government advisory group, which kept the age at 50 in an update two...
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May 29, 2018 - 3:58 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — A new study contends that many more deaths than normal occurred in Puerto Rico in the three months after Hurricane Maria devastated the island, mostly because of problems getting medicines or medical care. Researchers surveyed a small sample of neighborhoods and from...
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