Meteorology

FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump holds a chart as he talks with reporters after receiving a briefing on Hurricane Dorian in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. A government watchdog says the Commerce Department is trying to block the findings of an investigation into the agency’s role in rebuking forecasters who contradicted President Donald Trump’s inaccurate claims about the path of Hurricane Dorian in 2019. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci. File)
July 02, 2020 - 5:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A government watchdog says the Commerce Department is trying to block the findings of an investigation into the agency’s role in rebuking forecasters who contradicted President Donald Trump’s inaccurate claims about the path of Hurricane Dorian last year. The accusation comes from...
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A NHS worker is tested at a drive through coronavirus testing site in a car park at Chessington World of Adventures, in Chessington, England, Wednesday April 1, 2020. (Yui Mok/PA via AP)
April 01, 2020 - 11:05 am
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: ___ — Wimbledon canceled for the first time since...
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In this undated photo provided by NOAA, William Lapenta poses at the Weather Prediction Center, in College Park, Md. Lapenta, a federal scientist who oversaw weather prediction centers that track ocean, hurricane and even space conditions died Monday, Sept. 30, 2019, after lifeguards pulled him from the surf in rough seas on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. (NOAA via AP)
October 02, 2019 - 3:13 pm
DUCK, N.C. (AP) — A top weather forecasting official, who oversaw the government’s prediction centers that track ocean, hurricane and even space conditions, has died in rough seas on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. William Lapenta, 58, died Monday after lifeguards pulled him from the surf off the...
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In this photo provided by Hurricane Fall, responders treat a passenger on an Air Canada flight to Australia that was diverted and landed at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport in Honolulu on Thursday, July 11, 2019. The flight from Vancouver to Sydney encountered "un-forecasted and sudden turbulence," about two hours past Hawaii when the plane diverted to Honolulu, Air Canada spokeswoman Angela Mah said in a statement. (Tim Tricky/Hurricane Fall via AP)
July 12, 2019 - 5:22 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Passengers on a flight from Canada to Australia said they had no warning about turbulence that suddenly slammed people into the ceiling of the plane and injured more than three dozen — a phenomenon that experts say can be nearly impossible for pilots to see coming. The Air Canada...
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This image from NOAA shows a portion of a tornado warning for Alabama issued at 1 p.m. CST on Sunday, March 3, 2019 before a tornado hit later in the day. Predicting with any precision where a tornado is going to go is still beyond the limits of meteorology, which is why warnings went out for a large two-county area when a tornado might be only half a mile wide. And getting people to listen and take precautions is another matter altogether. (NOAA via AP)
March 05, 2019 - 6:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sometimes in forecasting tornadoes, you can get everything technically right, and yet it all goes horribly wrong. Three days before the killer Alabama tornado struck, government severe-storm meteorologists cautioned that conditions could be ripe for twisters in the Southeast on...
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January 09, 2019 - 4:56 pm
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Did a TV meteorologist broadcast a racial slur or simply flub a line? That polarizing question has reverberated in this upstate New York city and beyond since WHEC fired Jeremy Kappell after he apparently referred to a park in his weather report as "Martin Luther Coon King Jr...
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April 06, 2018 - 6:46 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Jeffrey B. Halverson, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (THE CONVERSATION) It was March 2017, and a winter storm named Stella promised to deliver up to a foot and a half of snow...
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March 13, 2018 - 6:21 pm
LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) — A former TV weatherman who legally changed his name to Meteorologist Drew Anderson says there's a 100 percent chance he'll run for Congress in Pennsylvania under the new moniker. LNP reports Anderson is collecting signatures to get on the Republican primary ballot for a run...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
February 08, 2018 - 12:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has championed the continued burning of fossil fuels while...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
February 07, 2018 - 6:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has championed the continued burning of fossil fuels while...
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