Microbiology

FILE - This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. Some political leaders are hailing a potential breakthrough in the fight against COVID-19: simple pin-prick blood tests or nasal swabs that can determine within minutes if someone has, or previously had, the virus. But some scientists have challenged their accuracy. (NIAID-RML via AP)
March 27, 2020 - 2:47 pm
MADRID (AP) — Some political leaders are hailing a potential breakthrough in the fight against COVID-19: simple pin-prick blood tests or nasal swabs that can determine within minutes if someone has, or previously had, the virus. The tests could reveal the true extent of the outbreak and help...
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February 21, 2020 - 11:11 am
MIAMI (AP) — A Mexican scientist accused of spying for Russia in Miami will be detained without bail for now, a federal judge decided Friday. The temporary public defender for 35-year-old Hector Cabrera Fuentes said he agreed to remain in jail while his family works to hire a private lawyer. “If...
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February 19, 2020 - 6:37 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A Mexican microbiologist accused of spying for Russia in Miami is considered a benefactor in his native state of Oaxaca, the mayor of his hometown said Wednesday, and he holds positions with at least two prominent universities. Mayor Hazael Matus said scientist Hector Alejandro...
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This artist's rendering made available by NASA shows multiple views of the Dragonfly dual-quadcopter lander that would take advantage of the atmosphere on Saturn's moon Titan to explore multiple locations, some hundreds of miles apart. On Thursday, June 2u7, 2019, NASA announced it would send the drone to the jovian planet's largest moon. Scientists have long considered Titan an attractive place to study whether it would be capable of supporting microbial life. (NASA via AP)
June 27, 2019 - 6:57 pm
Get ready to see another world from the eyes of a dragonfly — at least, a robotic one. NASA said Thursday that it's sending a drone called Dragonfly to explore Saturn's largest moon, Titan. Using propellers, the drone will fly and land on several spots on the icy moon to study whether it can...
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In this March 15, 2019 photo, Brian Jetter poses for a portrait in La Jolla, Calif. In 2018 at 40, he was suddenly battling pneumonia and sepsis, and a slew of tests had failed to find the cause. But a high-tech genetic test was used to search his blood for bits of non-human genetic material from viruses, fungi and the like. It detected unusual bacteria that probably got into the Connecticut man's lungs when he choked and accidentally inhaled bits of a burger weeks earlier. (AP Photo/Marilynn Marchione)
June 12, 2019 - 5:03 pm
Brian Jetter was on life support, a healthy 40-year-old suddenly battling pneumonia and sepsis, and a slew of tests had failed to find the cause. Mystery illnesses like this kill thousands of people each year when germs can't be identified fast enough to reveal the right treatment. Now genetic...
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This 2011 digitally-colorized electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a clump of green-colored, spheroid-shaped, Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria on a purple-colored matrix. We share our bodies with trillions of mostly friendly microbes that are important for things like good digestion. Now scientists are learning how that microbial zoo can change in ways that one day might let them predict who’s at risk for brewing health problems. (NIAID via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 1:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — We share our bodies with trillions of microbes that are critical to staying healthy, but now scientists are getting a much-needed close look at how those bugs can get out of whack and spur disease. One lesson: A single test to see what gut bacteria you harbor won't tell much...
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May 10, 2019 - 5:11 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A microorganism that played a role in treating tuberculosis is now officially recognized as New Jersey's state microbe. Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill Friday giving the distinction to Streptomyces (strep-toh-MY'-seez) griseus (GREE'-say-us). The microbe was discovered in New...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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This May 3, 2018 photo provided by Benjamin Bond-Lamberty shows a device measuring the amount of carbon dioxide released into the air from the soil at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center near Edgewater, Md. Observations from across the globe show that as temperatures have warmed, bacteria and fungi in the soil are becoming more active. These turbo-charged microbes are feeding on dead leaves and plants, releasing more heat-trapping carbon dioxide into the air, according to a study in the Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2018 edition of the journal Nature. (Benjamin Bond-Lamberty via AP)
August 01, 2018 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Even the dirt on the ground is making climate change worse, a new study finds. Plants capture massive amounts of carbon, pumping it into the soil where usually it stays for hundreds or thousands of years. Observations from across the globe show that as temperatures have warmed,...
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The March 27, 2018 photo shows the inside of a rubber duck after it was cut open for the photo in Nauen, Germany. Swiss researchers now say the cute, yellow bath-time friends harbor a dirty secret: Microbes swimming inside. The Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology says researchers turned up “dense growths of bacteria and fungi” on the insides of toys like rubber ducks and crocodiles.( AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop)
March 27, 2018 - 10:48 pm
BERN, Switzerland (AP) — Scientists have the dirt on the rubber ducky: Those cute yellow bath-time toys are — as some parents have long suspected — a haven for nasty bugs. Swiss and American researchers counted the microbes swimming inside the toys and say the murky liquid released when ducks were...
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