Millennials

FILE - In this July 26, 2019 file photo, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., attends a House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Ocasio-Cortez says she wants to hear Democratic hopeful Joe Biden speak in detail on how to provide health care for everyone. The freshman congresswoman from Queens, New York tells The Associated Press that Biden is “struggling” with millennials and people of color and needs to describe how he'd preserve Medicare, for example, for people who won't need it for decades. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
April 13, 2020 - 3:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden should “at a bare minimum” talk specifics about providing health care for everyone if he hopes to build enthusiasm for his campaign against President Donald Trump, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told The Associated Press. The freshman...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a press briefing with the coronavirus task force, in the Brady press briefing room at the White House, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
AP News
March 17, 2020 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ahead of an expected surge in coronavirus cases, President Donald Trump on Tuesday moved to blunt the impact of the pandemic on the U.S. economy, fundamentally altered by a push for a nation to stay home. As the global markets fluctuated amid fears of a recession, the president...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2004 file photo shows a selection of holiday season catalogs in Portland, Maine. Catalogs, those glossy paper-and-ink offerings of outdoor apparel, kitchenware and fruit baskets, are not yet headed for the recycling bin of history. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 21, 2019 - 3:30 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Catalogs, those glossy paper-and-ink offerings of outdoor apparel, kitchenware and fruit baskets, are not yet headed for the recycling bin of history. Until recently, the future appeared grim for the mailbox-stuffers. A one-two punch of postal rate increases and the Great...
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FILE - This April 3, 2019, file photo shows a tip box is filled with U.S. currency in New York. For millennials who are passionate about contributing to the greater good, there are ways to prioritize charitable giving and make the greatest impact on issues they care about (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
December 03, 2019 - 11:20 am
It may not come as a surprise that millennials are passionate about giving back. Millennials as a generation believe in supporting causes more than individual organizations, are likely to be influenced by peer networks when it comes to giving and want to give back in terms of money, time and...
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FILE - In this June 15, 2017, file photo, people walk inside the Oculus, the new transit station at the World Trade Center in New York. For millennials who anxious about financial decisions, there are ways to take charge: start by knowing your attitude toward money, taking actions right for you and getting help. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 29, 2019 - 10:47 am
Financial decisions are rarely easy, whether it's buying your first car or home or deciding whether to refinance student loans. The anxiety can be heightened for millennials who witnessed economic turmoil during the Great Recession as they weigh milestone financial choices as adults. "Many (...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2019, file photo commuters walk through a corridor in the World Trade Center Transportation Hub in New York. Millennial workers are more likely than older generations to report being burned out at work, according to a 2018 Gallup study. The gig economy, the temptations of social media and the high expectations millennials have of themselves contribute to this trend, behavioral finance experts say. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
September 25, 2019 - 12:52 pm
Millennials are a burned-out bunch. Millennial workers are more likely than older generations to report being burned out at work, according to a 2018 Gallup study. The gig economy, the temptations of social media and the high expectations millennials have of themselves contribute to this trend,...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2018, file photo a for rent sign denotes the availability of another existing home in Jackson, Miss. Millennials are delaying homeownership and staying in leased housing longer than previous generations, studies show. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
August 20, 2019 - 9:51 am
"Renting is just throwing money away." "Renting is like paying someone else instead of paying yourself." You may have heard these opinions from family and friends, but it's not that simple. In some areas (looking at you, San Francisco), renting is far more economical than buying a home. But renting...
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FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2018, file photo credit union members stand in line at Blackhawk Community Credit Union on East Milwaukee Street in Janesville, Wis. Credit unions, with their great savings and loan rates and excellent service, offer an alternative to traditional banks. (The Janesville Gazette via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 11:00 am
An underused money tool that could help a new generation of adults on their path to prosperity isn't a smartphone app, a virtual currency or a digital payment system. It's an old-timey credit union. Credit unions , if you're unfamiliar, are like nonprofit banks. They may not satisfy all your money-...
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FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2015, file photo, ice covered Lake Michigan is seen behind downtown skyline, in Chicago. Big cities, like Chicago, aren't growing like they used to. New figures released by the U.S. Census Bureau on Thursday, May 23, 2019, show most of the nation's largest cities last year grew by a fraction of the numbers they did earlier this decade. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
May 23, 2019 - 3:57 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Big cities in the U.S. aren't growing like they used to. Most of the nation's largest cities last year grew by a fraction of the numbers they did earlier in the decade, according to population and housing unit estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The previous...
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South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg speaks to a crowd about his Presidential run during the Democratic monthly breakfast held at the Circle of Friends Community Center in Greenville, S.C. Saturday, March 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Shiro)
March 24, 2019 - 12:21 am
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg told voters Saturday that his marriage to his husband exists "by the grace of a single vote on the U.S. Supreme Court." The South Bend, Indiana, mayor visited South Carolina for the first time since announcing his presidential...
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