Nuclear weapons

A man and his daughter pray for the victims of U.S. atomic bombing at the Atomic Bomb Hypocenter Park in Nagasaki, southern Japan, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. Nagasaki marked the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombing on Sunday. (Takuto Kaneko/Kyodo News via AP)
August 09, 2020 - 1:39 am
TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese city of Nagasaki on Sunday marked its 75th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing, with the mayor and dwindling survivors urging world leaders including their own to do more for a nuclear weapons ban. At 11:02 a.m., the moment the B-29 bomber Bockscar dropped a 4.5-ton (10...
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Visitors observe a minute of silence for the victims of the atomic bombing, at 8:15am, the time atomic bomb exploded over the city, at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park during the ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in Hiroshima, western Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
August 06, 2020 - 8:32 am
HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Survivors of the world’s first atomic bombing gathered in diminished numbers near an iconic, blasted dome Thursday to mark the attack’s 75th anniversary, many of them urging the world, and their own government, to do more to ban nuclear weapons. An upsurge of coronavirus...
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Lee Jong-keun speaks his experience of atomic bombing during an interview with The Associated Press in Hiroshima, western Japan Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. For nearly 70 years, until he turned 85, Lee hid his past as an atomic bomb survivor, fearful of the widespread discrimination against blast victims that has long persisted in Japan. But Lee, 92, is now part of a fast-dwindling group of survivors, known as hibakusha, that feels a growing urgency - desperation even - to tell their stories. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
August 04, 2020 - 4:21 am
HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — For nearly 70 years, until he turned 85, Lee Jong-keun hid his past as an atomic bomb survivor, fearful of the widespread discrimination against blast victims that has long persisted in Japan. But Lee, 92, is now part of a fast-dwindling group of survivors, known as...
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This undated artist rending provided by the U.S. Air Force shows a U.S. Air Force graphic of the Long Range Strike Bomber, designated the B-21. The Air Force expects to spend at least $55 billion to field an all-new nuclear-capable bomber for the future, the B-21 Raider, at the same time the Pentagon will be spending hundreds of billions of dollars to replace all of the other major elements of the nation's nuclear weapons arsenal. The Air Force also is investing heavily in new fighters and refueling aircraft, and like the rest of the military it foresees tighter defense budgets ahead. (U.S. Air Force via AP)
July 25, 2020 - 10:59 am
WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. (AP) — In the topsy-turvy world of U.S. strategic bombers, older and uglier sometimes beats newer and snazzier. As the Air Force charts a bomber future in line with the Pentagon's new focus on potential war with China or Russia, the youngest and flashiest — the stealthy...
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FILE - In this April 22, 1952 file photo a gigantic pillar of smoke with the familiar mushroom top climbs above Yucca Flat, Nev. during nuclear test detonation. A defense spending bill pending in Congress includes an apology to New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and other states affected by nuclear testing over the decades, but communities downwind from the first atomic test in 1945 are still holding out for compensation amid rumblings about the potential for the U.S. to resume nuclear testing. (AP Photo,File)
July 24, 2020 - 7:10 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Deep within a multibillion-dollar defense spending measure pending in Congress is an apology to New Mexico, Nevada, Utah and other states affected by radiation from nuclear testing over the decades. But communities downwind from the first atomic test in the New Mexico...
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Casings identical to those used for the "Fat Man" and "Little Boy" atomic bombs are displayed Wednesday, July 15, 2020, at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque, N.M. Thursday marked the 75th anniversary of the Trinity Test, when government scientists and the U.S. military conducted the first atomic detonation in the southern New Mexico desert. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan)
July 16, 2020 - 9:59 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Transported in the backseat of a blacked-out Plymouth sedan was the culmination of years of feverish work — a hefty plutonium core that would soon be used to trigger the world’s first atomic explosion. Within days of being taken in 1945 from a top secret installation in the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2019, file photo, National Nuclear Security Administration administrator Lisa Gordon-Hagerty talks about her agency's work to reduce global nuclear threats during a business conference in Albuquerque, N.M. Lisa Gordon-Hagerty will visit New Mexico Thursday, July 16, 2020 as part of a nationwide tour of the federal government's nuclear security operations. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
July 15, 2020 - 9:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The 2030 deadline set by the U.S. government to resume and ramp up production of the plutonium cores used in the nation’s nuclear arsenal is nothing short of challenging, but the head of the National Nuclear Security Administration said Wednesday she’s confident her agency...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 file photo, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, attends a meeting with Sweden's Foreign Minister Ann Linde in Moscow, Russia. Lavrov said Friday, July 10 that contacts with the U.S. negotiators leave little optimism about the possibility of extending the New START arms control treaty that expires next February. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, file)
July 10, 2020 - 11:00 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's top diplomat said Friday he's not very optimistic about prospects for an extension of the last remaining U.S.-Russia arms control agreement because of Washington's focus on making China sign up to the pact. Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov warned that Russia only wants to keep...
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FILE - This undated file aerial view shows the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, N.M. Several groups are asking state and federal officials to hold semi-annual public meetings as Los Alamos National Laboratory prepares to resume and ramp up production of key components for the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. (Albuquerque Journal via AP, File)
July 07, 2020 - 1:04 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Officials at one of the nation’s premier nuclear labs are investigating the potential exposure of employees to plutonium. Los Alamos National Laboratory confirmed Monday that 15 workers were being evaluated after a breach involving a gloved box that was being used to handle...
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In this photo released by Israel Ministry of Defense Spokesperson's Office, the "Ofek 16" reconnaissance satellite blasts off at the Palmachim air base in central Israel Monday, July 6, 2020. The new satellite, which quickly entered orbit, joins a collection of spy satellites that Israel has deployed in recent years. (Israel Ministry of Defense Spokesperson's Office via AP)
July 06, 2020 - 2:46 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel said it successfully launched a new spy satellite into space on Monday as its leaders hinted it was behind a massive fire at an Iranian nuclear site last week — potentially ratcheting up a long-running covert war. If Israel was responsible for the fire at the heavily...
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