Occupational accidents

May 16, 2020 - 11:33 am
NEW RICHMOND, Wis. (AP) — A track worker at a Wisconsin raceway was killed during a school bus race Friday night while attempting to move a damaged bus, authorities said. Edward Nicholson, 62, of River Falls, died after the bus rolled onto him at Cedar Lake Speedway near New Richmond, according to...
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Workers wait in line to enter the Tyson Foods pork processing plant in Logansport, Ind., Thursday, May 7, 2020. The plant was expected to Thursday after closing on April 25 after nearly 900 employees tested positive for the coronavirus. Workers won't be able to return to work until they get tested. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
May 08, 2020 - 6:06 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As coronavirus hotspots erupted at major U.S. meatpacking plants, experts criticized extremely tight working conditions that made the factories natural high risk contagion locations. But some Midwestern politicians have pointed the finger at the workers' living conditions,...
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David Maynard sifts through the rubble searching for his wallet, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Onalaska, Texas, after a tornado destroyed his home the night before. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP)
April 23, 2020 - 8:15 pm
MADILL, Okla. (AP) — Severe weather blew through the South on Thursday after killing at least seven people in Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana, including a worker at a factory hit by an apparent tornado, a man whose car was blown off the road and a man who went outside to grab a trash can and was...
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In this April 2020, photo provided by Tyson Foods, workers wear protective masks and stand between plastic dividers at the company's Camilla, Georgia poultry processing plant. Tyson has added the plastic dividers to create separation between workers because of the coronavirus outbreak. (Tyson Foods via AP)
April 23, 2020 - 4:19 pm
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Daily reports of giant meat-processing plants closing because workers tested positive for the coronavirus have called into question whether slaughterhouses can remain virus-free. According to experts, the answer may be no. Given that the plants employ thousands of people who...
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A safe-distancing enforcement officer wearing a red armband watches over customers lining up to buy take-away food at a food court in Singapore on Saturday, April 18, 2020. The officers have been deployed throughout the Southeast Asian city-state to ensure people maintain distance from one another as it grapples with a spike in coronavirus cases. (AP Photo/YK Chan)
April 18, 2020 - 8:46 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Singapore reported 942 new coronavirus cases on Saturday, a single-day high for the tiny city-state that pushed its total number of infections to 5,992, including 11 deaths. The number of cases in Singapore has more than doubled over the past week amid an explosion of infections...
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In this photo taken Friday, April 10, 2020, Martine Milonde, a Congolese community mobilizer who works with the aid group World Vision in Beni, eastern Congo, which became the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak, engages the public about coronavirus prevention. Congo has been battling an Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands of people for more than 18 months, and now it must also face a new scourge: the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro)
April 11, 2020 - 11:10 am
BENI, Congo (AP) — Congo has been battling an Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands of people for more than 18 months, and now it must also face a new scourge: the coronavirus pandemic. Ebola has left those living in the country’s east weary and fearful, and, just as they were preparing to...
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FILE - In this May 2, 2010 photo, Institute of Marine Mammal Sciences researcher Justin Main takes photographs of a dead sea turtle on the beach in Pass Christian, Miss. The National Wildlife Federation released a report Tuesday, April 7, 2020, looking at Gulf restoration after the BP oil spill. The report states serious ongoing harm to dolphins, turtles and other wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)
April 07, 2020 - 3:42 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A decade after the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, dolphins, turtles and other wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico are still seriously at risk, according to a report released Tuesday. The fact that the Gulf hasn’t fully recovered is “hardly surprising given the enormity of...
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CORRECTS BYLINE TO BEBETO MATTHEWS, NOT SETH WENIG - The Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort passes under the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge on its way to docking in New York, Monday, March 30, 2020. The ship has 1,000 beds and 12 operating rooms that could be up and running within 24 hours of its arrival on Monday morning. It's expected to bolster a besieged health care system by treating non-coronavirus patients while hospitals treat people with COVID-19. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
AP News
March 30, 2020 - 6:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A Navy hospital ship with 1,000 beds arrived Monday in New York City as the number of deaths in the state from the coronavirus outbreak climbed quickly. The disease continued to claim the lives of health care workers. Mayor Bill de Blasio said President Donald Trump’s suggestion...
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FILE - In this Aug. 9, 1944 file photo, U.S. soldiers walk by a bombed out cemetery in Agana, Guam. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)
February 27, 2020 - 5:28 pm
HAGATÑA, Guam (AP) — For Antonina Palomo Cross, Japan's occupation of Guam started with terror at church. The then-7-year-old was attending Catholic services with her family when the 1941 invasion began, setting off bomb blasts, sirens and screams. It ended with her family surrendering their home...
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In this Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020, photo, Houston resident Guadalupe Ortiz takes her daily walk at a city park located across the street from her home and a Valero oil refinery. Houston's lack of zoning has resulted in residents like Ortiz living next to petrochemical facilities and businesses that handle hazardous substances. (AP Photo/ Juan Lozano)
February 15, 2020 - 10:22 am
HOUSTON (AP) — Houston’s lack of zoning restrictions has left many residents with neighbors they don't want: petrochemical facilities and businesses that handle hazardous materials. That unease was laid bare again last month when a massive explosion leveled a metal fabricating and manufacturing...
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