Personal health insurance

July 12, 2018 - 6:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare says it wants to pay doctors for analyzing photos texted by patients, one of several steps to keep up with how technology is changing health care. Doctors would also be able to bill separately for brief video consultations with patients. Medicare may count phone calls as...
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FILE - In this July 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks about healthcare in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington.The Trump administration says it’s freezing payments under an ‘Obamacare’ program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses, a move expected to add to premium increases next year. Making the announcement Saturday, July 7, 2018 officials say the administration is acting because of conflicting rulings in lawsuits filed by some smaller insurers who question whether they’re being fairly treated. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 08, 2018 - 7:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is freezing payments under an "Obamacare" program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses, a move expected to add to premium increases next year. At stake are billions in payments to insurers with sicker customers. The latest...
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FILE - In this July 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks about healthcare in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington.The Trump administration says it’s freezing payments under an ‘Obamacare’ program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses, a move expected to add to premium increases next year. Making the announcement Saturday, July 7, 2018 officials say the administration is acting because of conflicting rulings in lawsuits filed by some smaller insurers who question whether they’re being fairly treated. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 08, 2018 - 5:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Saturday it's freezing payments under an "Obamacare" program that protects insurers with sicker patients from financial losses, a move expected to add to premium increases next year. At stake are billions in payments to insurers with sicker customers...
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June 23, 2018 - 4:34 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston hospital that suspended its renowned heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny following the deaths of two patients could lose federal Medicaid funding. Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center was notified Friday that Medicare plans to halt funding to its heart...
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President Donald Trump speaks at the National Federation of Independent Businesses 75th anniversary celebration, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
June 19, 2018 - 2:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's new health insurance option offers lower premiums for small businesses and self-employed people, but the policies are likely to cover fewer benefits. Another caveat: if healthy people flock to the new plans as expected, premiums will rise for those who...
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June 18, 2018 - 9:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is close to finalizing a health insurance option for small firms and self-employed people that would cost less but could cover fewer benefits than current plans, congressional officials and business groups said Monday. They spoke on condition of anonymity...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 09, 2018 - 8:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 08, 2018 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
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FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2013 file photo, the Social Security Administration's main campus is seen in Woodlawn, Md. Medicare’s financial problems have gotten worse, and Social Security’s can’t be ignored forever. The government’s annual assessment is a sobering checkup on programs vital to the middle class. The report from program trustees says Medicare will become insolvent in 2026, three years earlier than previously forecast. The report says Social Security will become insolvent in 2034, no change from the projection last year.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
June 06, 2018 - 1:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare will run out of money sooner than expected, and Social Security's financial problems can't be ignored either, the government said Tuesday in a sobering checkup on programs vital to the middle class. The report from program trustees says Medicare will become insolvent in...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2011, file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. Medicare recipients cut back on pricey brand-name drugs but they still had to spend more on such medications anyway, according to a government report that blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
June 04, 2018 - 9:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare recipients filled fewer prescriptions for pricey brand-name drugs — but spent more on such meds anyway, says a government report released Monday. It blames rising manufacturer prices for squeezing older people and taxpayers. The Health and Human Services inspector general...
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