Population growth and decline

In this Jan. 11, 2018 photo, people walk on a pedestrian crossing at Shibuya district in Tokyo. Japan's economy grew at a slower than expected 0.5 percent annual pace in the October-December quarter, as strong exports failed to fully compensate for relatively weak domestic demand, according to the preliminary data released Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
February 13, 2018 - 9:37 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's economy grew at a slower than expected 0.5 percent annual pace in the October-December quarter, as strong exports failed to fully compensate for relatively weak domestic demand. The preliminary data released Wednesday show Japan has managed eighth straight quarters of growth,...
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In this Friday, Jan. 19, 2018 photo, shows one of multiple properties located in the Esperanza sector that are currently for sale, in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Hundreds of thousands of Puerto Ricans face losing their homes upon the expiration of a three-month moratorium on mortgage payments that banks offered after Hurricane Maria devastated the island (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
January 25, 2018 - 8:18 am
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's governor submitted a revised fiscal plan overnight Thursday that estimates the U.S. Caribbean territory's economy will shrink by 11 percent and its population drop by nearly 8 percent next year. The proposal doesn't set aside any money to pay creditors in...
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A worker places a plant during preparations for the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, WEF, in Davos, Switzerland, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. The meeting brings together entrepreneurs, scientists, chief executives and political leaders from Jan. 23 to 26. (Gian Ehrenzeller/Keystone via AP)
January 22, 2018 - 4:53 am
DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — A CEO from one of the world's top five global fashion brands has to work for just four days to earn what a garment worker in Bangladesh will earn in an entire lifetime, campaigning group Oxfam International said Monday. In the run-up to the World Economic Forum in the...
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This photo posted Jan. 11, 2018, by ultraconservative Ahrar al-Sham militant group, that is consistent with independent AP reporting, shows Ahrar al-Sham rocket launcher fires at Syrian government forces position in the town of Atshan, north Hama countryside, Syria. Insurgent groups launched a counteroffensive Thursday against government forces advancing toward a major rebel-held air base in the country's northwest, capturing several villages and taking prisoners, opposition groups said. Arabic read, "Ahrar al-Sham," and "The readiness of the Mujahideen before the start of the battle to control the points of the Assad militia in the town of Atshan." (Ahrar al-Sham, via AP)
January 11, 2018 - 1:50 pm
BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian insurgent groups launched a counteroffensive Thursday against government forces advancing toward a major rebel-held air base in the country's northwest Idlib province, capturing several villages and taking prisoners, opposition groups said. The push by several factions,...
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In this 2014 photo provided by Joshua Daskin, a hippopotamus charges into the waters of Lake Urema, in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. Although some animals are killed in the crossfire or by mines, war primarily changes social and economic conditions in a way that make it tough on animals, said study co-author Rob Pringle, an ecologist at Princeton University. Gorongosa's hippos and other wildlife were devastated by civil war in the 1980s and 90s, but have recovered dramatically over the past decade thanks to a pioneering effort by the Mozambican Government to enlist conservationists, scientists, and local communities in ecological restoration. (Joshua Daskin via AP)
January 10, 2018 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — War is hell for wildlife, too. A new study finds that wartime is the biggest threat to Africa's elephants, rhinos, hippos and other large animals. The researchers analyzed how decades of conflict in Africa have affected populations of large animals. More than 70 percent of Africa'...
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December 27, 2017 - 7:06 pm
Recent editorials from North Carolina newspapers: ___ Dec. 25 The Fayetteville Observer on the state hiding what is happening in prisons: In April, Sgt. Meggan Callahan was beaten to death by an inmate at the Bertie Correctional Institution. Just six months later, four prison employees died in a...
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In this Sept. 29, 2017, photo, people cross streets at Tokyo's shopping and entertainment district of Shibuya in Tokyo. Japan's economy grew at a 2.5 percent annual pace in July-September, faster than the earlier estimate of 1.4 percent growth, the government reported Friday, Dec. 8, 2017. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
December 07, 2017 - 11:55 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's economy is gaining momentum, expanding at a 2.5 percent annual pace in July-September, the government said Friday. The upward revision from an earlier estimate of 1.4 percent growth reflects higher business investment and rising inventories, it said. In quarterly terms the...
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December 07, 2017 - 9:24 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Over 1.2 million people in war-torn South Sudan are one step away from famine — twice as many as at the same time last year — and in early 2018 half the country's population will be reliant on emergency food aid, the U.N. humanitarian chief said Thursday. Mark Lowcock told the...
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Wearing a Christmas headband, Grace Fernandez, who is homeless, smokes outside her tent in the Skid Row area of downtown Los Angeles, Friday, Dec. 1, 2017. "Holidays are just so much special. It should bring us altogether as one even if we are homeless," said Fernandez. The U.S. Department on Housing and Urban Development release of the 2017 homeless numbers are expected to show a dramatic increase in the number of people lacking shelter along the West Coast. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
December 06, 2017 - 4:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The nation's homeless population increased this year for the first time since 2010, driven by a surge in the number of people living on the streets in Los Angeles and other West Coast cities. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development released its annual Point in Time...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2016 file photo muslims offer Eid al-Adha prayers in a convention center in Marseille, southern France. A new study on Europe's Muslim population suggests that even if all migration into the continent were to stop permanently, the group's share would still be expected to increase to 7.4 percent from the current level of 4.9 percent by 2050. Thursday's, Nov. 30, 2017 report by the Pew Research Center modeled three scenarios on Europe's future Muslim population that vary depending on future levels of migration. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
November 29, 2017 - 6:49 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Europe's Muslim population will continue to grow over the next several decades even if all immigration to the continent should stop, according to a study published Thursday. The Pew Research Center report modeled three scenarios for estimating the number of Muslims who would be living...
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