Prisoner rights

FILE - In this July 8, 2010 file photo, teenagers head toward the gym at Caddo Juvenile Detention Center in Shreveport, La. Fear and frustration is raging as fast as the coronavirus in some juvenile detention centers, with riots and escapes reported in hotspot facilities such as New York and Louisiana. (Val Horvath/The Shreveport Times via AP, File)
May 02, 2020 - 10:35 pm
Nicole Hingle wasn’t surprised when the call came. Frustrations had been building inside juvenile detention centers nationwide as the number of coronavirus cases continued to climb. Now, her 17-year-old son Jace, was on the phone telling her around 40 kids had rioted at his facility in Louisiana —...
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FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2006, file photo a person drive through the gates of a federal prison in Oakdale, La. The federal Bureau of Prisons is locking all its 146,000 inmates in their cells for the next two weeks in an unparalleled effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus, as the focus shifts to the Louisiana compound, where two inmates have died and nearly 20 others remain hospitalized. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
April 13, 2020 - 12:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Prisoner rights advocates accused the federal Bureau of Prisons of “slow walking" the release of inmates at a Louisiana lockup where the coronavirus has killed six prisoners and infected dozens of others. The American Civil Liberties Union urged a federal judge on Monday to...
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This photo provided courtesy of the White family, shows U.S. Navy veteran Michael White, Thursday, March 19, 2020 in Mashhad, Iran. Two Americans imprisoned in the Middle East have been released. Iran has granted a medical furlough to U.S. Navy veteran Michael White as part of its efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus, and a Lebanese judge orderrs the release of Amer Fakhoury because more than 10 years had passed since the crimes he was accused of committing. (Courtesy of the White Family via AP)
March 19, 2020 - 6:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An American jailed for months in Lebanon was released from custody Thursday, while a Navy veteran was granted medical furlough from an Iran prison as the country struggles to curb the spread of coronavirus, U.S. officials said. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that Michael...
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A man stands on the roof of the San Vittore prison during a protest in Milan, Italy, Monday, March 9, 2020. Italian penitentiary police say six inmates protesting virus containment measures at a northern Italian prison have died after they broke into the infirmary and overdosed on methadone. The protest Sunday in Modena was among the first of more than two-dozen riots at Italy’s overcrowded lock-ups that grew Monday. Human rights advocates have been warning that increasing tensions over fears of coronavirus were hitting inmates particularly hard, especially after restrictions were imposed on family visits to prevent transmissions. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
March 09, 2020 - 4:09 pm
ROME (AP) — Tensions in Italy's overcrowded prisons erupted Monday over new coronavirus containment measures, with riots in at least two dozen lock-ups and the deaths of six inmates who broke into an infirmary and overdosed on methadone. Italy's national prisoner rights advocate urged wardens to...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
AP News
February 24, 2020 - 11:48 am
LONDON (AP) — Truth-telling journalist or reckless criminal: A British judge was given two conflicting portraits of Julian Assange as the WikiLeaks founder's long-awaited extradition hearing began Monday in a London court. A lawyer for the U.S. authorities, who want to try Assange on espionage...
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FILE - This is a July 12, 2002 file photo of the entrance to the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman, Miss. The Justice Department has opened a civil rights investigation into the Mississippi prison system after a string of inmate deaths in the past few months, officials said Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Rogelio Solis, File)
February 05, 2020 - 8:32 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The Justice Department has opened a civil rights investigation into the Mississippi prison system after a string of inmate deaths in the past few months, officials said Wednesday. Federal prosecutors are looking into conditions at four state prisons after the deaths of at...
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FILE - In this April 17, 2019 file photo reviewed by U.S. military officials, a U.S. flag flies inside the razor wire of the Camp VI detention facility in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. A former CIA contractor who helped design the agency’s harsh interrogation program following the Sept. 11 attacks pushed back Friday on the notion that the survival training for U.S. service members, which became the basis for the “enhanced” techniques used on American captives, amounted to torture. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 31, 2020 - 6:08 pm
FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — A former CIA contractor who helped design a harsh interrogation program following the the Sept. 11 attacks sought Friday to minimize the severity of techniques used on the men facing war crimes charges for their alleged roles in the plot. John Bruce Jessen, testifying in...
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FILE - In this April 17, 2019 file photo reviewed by U.S. military officials, a U.S. flag flies inside the razor wire of the Camp VI detention facility, Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 21, 2020 - 12:56 pm
FORT MEADE, Md. (AP) — An architect of the harsh CIA interrogation program created after the Sept. 11 attacks faced men on Tuesday who were subjected to that treatment, appearing as a defense witness in a hearing that could decide whether key evidence against them can be used in their war crimes...
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In this Dec. 11, 2019, photo, Quentin Blackburn poses for a photo in Milwaukee. Blackburn is a felon who didn't realize he could vote when his probation was finished. "When I became a felon, it was like something was stripped from me," he said. "I felt like I didn't matter, you know, in a sense. So now I can vote now. It's good news. I'm happy." (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
January 13, 2020 - 1:21 am
MILWAUKEE (AP) — When Quentin Blackburn was sent to prison for his first felony conviction in the 1990s, the consequences were clear: he could no longer vote or possess a firearm. It wasn’t until last month that the 48-year-old Milwaukee man found out his right to vote was restored when he finished...
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FILE - In this July 21, 2010, photograph, employees leave the front gate of the Mississippi State Penitentiary in Parchman, Miss. Another Mississippi inmate died at the hands of a fellow inmate, Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020, this time, at the penitentiary, bringing the death toll to four amid disturbances over the past week in the state prison system. The violence comes even as a federal judge, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019, rejected claims that conditions in one Mississippi prison are unconstitutionally harsh. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
January 07, 2020 - 9:03 am
Prisoner advocates are calling on the federal government to investigate Mississippi’s prison system for possible civil rights violations, saying the violence of recent days highlights deliberate violations of inmates’ constitutional right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment. The Southern...
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