Prisoner rights

In this Saturday, April 15, 2017, photograph, the entrance to the GEO Group's immigrant detention facility is shown in Aurora, Colo. People once held in a privately run Colorado immigration detention center are challenging the system used to keep it clean and maintained, arguing it borders on slavery. They have won the right to sue GEO Group on behalf of an estimated 60,000 people held at its detention center near Denver over a decade. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
June 22, 2017 - 2:18 pm
DENVER (AP) — Every day, immigrants are told to clean their living areas in a privately run Colorado detention center or risk being put in solitary confinement. Some also volunteer to do jobs as varied as landscaping, more cleaning and cutting other inmates' hair, but the pay is always the same — $...
Read More
A former detainee shows how he was kept in handcuffs and leg shackles while held in a secret prison at Riyan airport in the Yemeni city of Mukalla in this May 11, 2017 photo. He covered his face for fear of being detained again. He and other former detainees say abuses are widespread in a network of secret prisons run by the United Arab Emirates and its Yemeni allies, into which hundreds detained in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared. (AP Photo/Maad El Zikry)
June 22, 2017 - 12:02 pm
MUKALLA, Yemen (AP) — Hundreds of men swept up in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared into a secret network of prisons in southern Yemen where abuse is routine and torture extreme — including the "grill," in which the victim is tied to a spit like a roast and spun in a circle of fire,...
Read More
A former detainee shows how he was kept in handcuffs and leg shackles while held in a secret prison at Riyan airport in the Yemeni city of Mukalla in this May 11, 2017 photo. He covered his face for fear of being detained again. He and other former detainees say abuses are widespread in a network of secret prisons run by the United Arab Emirates and its Yemeni allies, into which hundreds detained in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared. (AP Photo/Maad El Zikry)
June 22, 2017 - 7:57 am
MUKALLA, Yemen (AP) — Hundreds of men swept up in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared into a secret network of prisons in southern Yemen where abuse is routine and torture extreme — including the "grill," in which the victim is tied to a spit like a roast and spun in a circle of fire,...
Read More
A former detainee shows how he was kept in handcuffs and leg shackles while held in a secret prison at Riyan airport in the Yemeni city of Mukalla in this May 11, 2017 photo. He covered his face for fear of being detained again. He and other former detainees say abuses are widespread in a network of secret prisons run by the United Arab Emirates and its Yemeni allies, into which hundreds detained in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared. (AP Photo/Maad El Zikry)
June 22, 2017 - 5:22 am
MUKALLA, Yemen (AP) — Hundreds of men swept up in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared into a secret network of prisons in southern Yemen where abuse is routine and torture extreme — including the "grill," in which the victim is tied to a spit like a roast and spun in a circle of fire,...
Read More
A former detainee shows how he was kept in handcuffs and leg shackles while held in a secret prison at Riyan airport in the Yemeni city of Mukalla in this May 11, 2017 photo. He covered his face for fear of being detained again. He and other former detainees say abuses are widespread in a network of secret prisons run by the United Arab Emirates and its Yemeni allies, into which hundreds detained in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared. (AP Photo/Maad El Zikry)
June 22, 2017 - 3:26 am
MUKALLA, Yemen (AP) — Hundreds of men swept up in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared into a secret network of prisons in southern Yemen where abuse is routine and torture extreme — including the "grill," in which the victim is tied to a spit like a roast and spun in a circle of fire,...
Read More
A former detainee shows how he was kept in handcuffs and leg shackles while held in a secret prison at Riyan airport in the Yemeni city of Mukalla in this May 11, 2017 photo. He covered his face for fear of being detained again. He and other former detainees say abuses are widespread in a network of secret prisons run by the United Arab Emirates and its Yemeni allies, into which hundreds detained in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared. (AP Photo/Maad El Zikry)
June 22, 2017 - 2:28 am
MUKALLA, Yemen (AP) — Hundreds of men swept up in the hunt for al-Qaida militants have disappeared into a secret network of prisons in southern Yemen where abuse is routine and torture extreme — including the "grill," in which the victim is tied to a spit like a roast and spun in a circle of fire,...
Read More
June 14, 2017 - 12:20 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Attorneys for a civil rights group will argue next week why they feel a South Carolina jail policy preventing them from meeting with inmates should be suspended during an ongoing lawsuit. Lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union and the Spartanburg County jail are...
Read More
June 02, 2017 - 4:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers and rights groups criticized the Republican head of the Senate intelligence committee on Friday for seeking the return of copies of a report on CIA treatment of detainees after 9/11. The critics claimed Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina, the committee...
Read More
This 2016 photo released by lawyer Mark Denbeaux shows his client Zayn al Abidin Muhammad Husayn, also known as Abu Zubaydah, at the detention center on the U.S. base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in a photo taken by the International Committee of the Red Cross. Abu Zubaydah, the first CIA captive subjected to so-called “enhanced interrogation techniques” after the Sept. 11 attacks is choosing to testify about conditions inside the Guantanamo Bay detention center even if it could create legal problems for him. (Mark Denbeaux via AP)
May 11, 2017 - 10:11 am
MIAMI (AP) — The first CIA captive subjected to what the U.S. government called "enhanced interrogation techniques" after the Sept. 11 attacks is choosing to testify about conditions inside the Guantanamo Bay detention center even if it could create legal problems for him later. The lawyer for the...
Read More

Pages