Radioactive contamination

This 2016 photo provided by U.S. Department of Energy shows the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the federal Nuclear site in eastern Idaho, A barrel containing radioactive sludge ruptured at the facility, federal officials said Thursday, April 12, 2018, resulting in no injuries and no risk to the public but possibly slowing progress in shipping waste out of the state. ( U.S. Department of Energy via AP)
April 12, 2018 - 7:54 pm
IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (AP) — The Latest on the rupture of a barrel with radioactive material at a site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory (all times local): 5:05 p.m. Federal officials say three firefighters got a small amount of radioactive material on their skin and were taken to medical...
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April 08, 2018 - 2:06 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Seven decades after making key portions of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are being exposed to radiation as they tear down buildings that helped create the nation's nuclear arsenal. Dozens of workers demolishing a...
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FILE - This March 6, 2014 file photo shows the idled Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nation's only underground nuclear waste repository, near Carlsbad, N.M. The U.S. Department of Energy has commissioned a national group of scientists to study the viability of diluting surplus weapons-grade plutonium and storing it permanently at the federal government’s underground repository in southern New Mexico. A committee of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has been tasked with evaluating the storage potential at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
March 17, 2018 - 11:57 am
CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Energy has commissioned a national group of scientists to study the viability of diluting surplus weapons-grade plutonium and storing it permanently at the federal government's underground repository in New Mexico. The panel of about 15 scientists from...
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March 12, 2018 - 7:47 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. scientists knew little about the impact of uranium mining in the Grand Canyon region before an Obama-era decision shut down new mining claims. Uranium first was discovered near the national park in the late 1940s and has been subject to boom-and-bust cycles. Mines...
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FILE--In this file photo taken June 13, 2017, the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant, right, stands adjacent to a dirt-covered rail tunnel, left, containing radioactive waste, amidst desert plants on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash. A new report says mistakes and mismanagement are to blame for the exposure of workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state to radioactive particles in December. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, file)
March 09, 2018 - 3:04 pm
RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — A new report says mistakes and mismanagement are to blame for the exposure of workers to radioactive particles at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington state. Contractor CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Co. on Thursday released its evaluation of what went wrong in...
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FILE--In this June 7, 2013, fie photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists, from left, Christine Dowling, Adam Benthem, and David Naftz collect soil samples on the Canyon Mine property in Arizona. More than a quarter of the way into a 20-year ban on the filing of new mining claims around the Grand Canyon, scientists say they don't have the data they need to show whether uranium negatively is impacting plants, animals and a water source for more than 30 million people. (Katie Walton-Day/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, file)
March 08, 2018 - 7:10 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. scientists studying the effects of uranium mining around the Grand Canyon say they are lacking information on whether the radioactive element is hurting plants, animals and a water source for more than 30 million people. And they would not get to fully gather it if...
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FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014, file photo, workers wearing protective gears stand outside Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant's reactor in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. A government-commissioned group of experts concluded Wednesday, March 7, 2018 that a costly underground ice wall is only partially effective in reducing the ever-growing amount of contaminated water at Japan's destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant, and that other measures are needed as well. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, Pool, File)
March 07, 2018 - 7:59 am
TOKYO (AP) — A government-commissioned group of experts concluded Wednesday that a costly underground ice wall is only partially effective in reducing the ever-growing amount of contaminated water at Japan's destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant, and said other measures are needed as well. The plant's...
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FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2013, file photo, a worker using a Geiger counter checks for possible radioactive contamination at Noryangjin Fisheries Wholesale Market in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea said Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, it will appeal the World Trade Organization's decision against Seoul's import bans on Japanese fishery products imposed in the wake of Fukushima nuclear meltdowns. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon. File)
February 23, 2018 - 3:45 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said Friday it will appeal the World Trade Organization's decision against bans on imports of Japanese fishery products after the Fukushima nuclear meltdowns. The government said in a statement that the appeal was meant to protect public health and safety. It...
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February 01, 2018 - 4:30 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency plans to clean up radioactive waste at a suburban St. Louis landfill by removing most of the Cold War-era nuclear material and capping the rest, the agency said Thursday. The announcement of the $236 million project ends years of wrangling over...
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In this Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018 photo, a fallout shelter sign hangs on a building on East 9th Street in New York. The fallout shelters, marked with metal signs featuring the symbol for radiation — three joined triangles inside a circle — were set up in tens of thousands of buildings nationwide in the early 1960s amid the nuclear arms race. In New York City alone there were believed to be about 18,000. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
January 17, 2018 - 6:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A generation of Americans knew just what to do in the event of a nuclear attack — or during a major false alarm, like the one over the weekend in Hawaii. Take cover in a building bearing a yellow fallout shelter symbol. But these days, that might not be the best option, or even an...
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