Rubella

July 08, 2020 - 5:12 am
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka and Maldives have become the first two countries in the World Health Organization's South-East Asia region to eliminate both measles and rubella ahead of a 2023 target, the U.N. health agency announced Wednesday. “This success is encouraging and demonstrates the...
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Anti-vaccination protestors Christie Nadzieja, front, Bob Runnells, back left, and Katie Bauer, back right, all of Vancouver, Washington, stand up and turn their backs on Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday, May 10, 2019, in Vancouver, Wash., as he signs a bill into law that eliminates personal belief and philosophical exemptions for the measles mumps and rubella vaccine for children who wish to attend school or day care. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
May 10, 2019 - 4:24 pm
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Parents in Washington state will no longer be able to claim a personal or philosophical exemption for their children from receiving the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine before attending a day care center or school under a measure signed Friday by Gov. Jay Inslee...
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FILE - This Feb. 6, 2015, file photo, shows a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine on a countertop at a pediatrics clinic in Greenbrae, Calif. A measles outbreak near Portland, Ore., has revived a bitter debate over so-called “philosophical” exemptions to childhood vaccinations as public health officials across the Pacific Northwest scramble to limit the fallout from the disease. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee last week declared a state of emergency because of the outbreak on Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
February 01, 2019 - 6:31 pm
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — A measles outbreak near Portland, Oregon, has revived a bitter debate over so-called "philosophical" exemptions to childhood vaccinations as public health officials across the Pacific Northwest scramble to limit the fallout. At least 44 people in Washington and Oregon have...
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In this undated photo provided by CDC.gov, Dr. Aimee Summers organizes the blood sample collection containers with Kenyan lab technicians at the International Rescue Committee medical clinic in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya. Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. On Wednesday, April 25, 2018, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. (Alaine Knipes/CDC.gov via AP)
April 25, 2018 - 3:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished...
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