Special interest groups

FILE - This Dec. 12, 2018, file photo shows traffic on the Hollywood Freeway in Los Angeles. The Trump administration is rolling back tough Obama-era mileage standards and gutting one of the United States' biggest efforts to slow climate change. The administration released its relaxed mileage rules Tuesday. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
March 31, 2020 - 4:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's rollback of mileage standards Tuesday marks a win for Americans who like their SUVs and pickup trucks, but the government's own estimates show big costs, too — more Americans dying from air pollution, more climate-damaging tailpipe exhaust and more...
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Linda DeFrancesco stocks shelves with her farm's own salsa, spreads, veggies and salsa at DeFrancesco Farm Stand in Northford, Conn., Thursday, March 26, 2020. Businesses across the state are worried about the impact of the coronavirus, even the ones considered "essential" like farmers' markets and garden centers. The farm stand opens Saturday at 10 a.m. (Dave Zajac/Record-Journal via AP)
March 30, 2020 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When will the money arrive? That's the urgent question for small business owners who have been devastated by the coronavirus outbreak. They're awaiting help from the $2 trillion rescue package signed into law Friday. But with bills fast coming due, no end to business closings and an...
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FILE - In this July 9, 2015, file photo, a man walks outside the headquarters of Gilead Sciences in Foster City, Calif. Gilead Sciences said Wednesday, March 25, 2020 it will give up the specialty status it received days earlier for its COVID-19 drug amid public outrage that the company was seeking to boost the profits of its treatment. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
March 25, 2020 - 3:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing public criticism, the maker of a promising coronavirus drug said Wednesday it will waive a special regulatory designation that could have allowed it to block competition and boost profits for its treatment. Gilead Sciences said it will ask U.S. regulators to revoke the so-...
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Osvaldo Salas, 29, stands with his son outside their home in suburban Phoenix on Wednesday, March 18, 2020. Salas, who isn't proficient in English, says he's disappointed state authorities haven't posted any information on the coronavirus in Spanish and that he has to rely on friends, family and TV for the latest. Salas, a restaurant cook, is worried about supporting his four children if he can't work anymore. (AP Photo/Astrid Galván)
March 18, 2020 - 11:48 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Osvaldo Salas speaks a little English, but not proficiently. The suburban Phoenix man relies on Spanish-language TV and friends and family for information on the coronavirus because state and local officials haven't posted any updates online in Spanish even as the global pandemic...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with tourism industry executives about the coronavirus, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 17, 2020 - 11:55 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration is considering a plan to turn back all people who cross the border illegally from Mexico, two administration officials said Tuesday, using powers they say the president has during pandemics like the coronavirus outbreak to mount what would be one of the...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2020, file photo people photograph the signage outside the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in Tukwila, Wash., that was closed due to concerns about the coronavirus. The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with symptoms of the illness caused by coronavirus who seek care. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday, March 13, 2020, that seeking treatment or preventive services will not impact someone's immigration status under the new public charge rule, which took effect last month. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times via AP, File)/The Seattle Times via AP)
March 13, 2020 - 10:42 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with coronavirus or virus symptoms if they seek care. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday that seeking treatment or...
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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2019, file photo, Luis, left, a migrant fleeing gang violence in Michoacan, sits with his 13-year-old son on a bench in a public park facing a tent camp for refugees in Juarez, Mexico. Luis' family has lived in the camp for two months while they wait to apply for asylum in the U.S., at a border crossing about a quarter of a mile away. The Supreme Court on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio, File)
March 11, 2020 - 3:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. The justices' order, over a dissenting vote...
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A father, in white, holds the hand of his daughter as they and other asylum seekers leave court under guard after some of them learned that they won't have to return to Mexico in light of a major federal court ruling against the Trump administration on Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, in El Paso, Texas. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Friday that sending asylum seekers to wait in Mexico is illegal nationwide. The ruling came during the asylum testimony of one family in the group being put into the van. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio)
February 29, 2020 - 9:27 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A Trump administration immigration policy that requires asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their cases wind through U.S. courts was blocked and then reinstated by a court in the matter of hours, creating chaos at border crossings, courtrooms and legal offices. A three-judge...
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Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden, speaks as he is endorsed by House Majority Whip, Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., background, in North Charleston, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
February 26, 2020 - 5:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is dangling a history-making promise shortly before South Carolina's presidential primary on Saturday, the first 2020 contest featuring a majority black electorate. Elect him president, Biden says, and he might nominate the first black woman to the Supreme Court. “As...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018, file photo, flames consume trees during a burnout operation that was performed south of County Road 202 near Durango, Colo. A report by the U.S. Geological Survey shows investments made to reduce the risk of wildfire in forested areas are paying dividends when it comes to creating jobs and infusing money in local economies. The study focused on several counties along the New Mexico-Colorado border that make up the watershed of the Rio Grande. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP, File)
February 19, 2020 - 5:21 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Projects to reduce the risk of wildfires and protect water sources in the U.S. West have created jobs and infused more money in local economies, researchers say, and they were funded by a partnership between governments and businesses that has become a model in other...
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