Special interest groups

FILE - In this Friday June 9, 2017 file photo, students are led out of school as members of the Fountain Police Department take part in an Active Shooter Response Training exercise at Fountain Middle School in Fountain, Colo. The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020 that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP, File)
February 11, 2020 - 4:56 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. The American Federation of...
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In this Feb. 6, 2020, photo, Peruvian Margarita Del Pilar Fitzpatrick, poses for a portrait at San Martin de Porres neighborhood in Lima, Peru. The day Fitzpatrick applied for an Illinois driver's license upended her life. When a clerk offered to register her to vote, the Peruvian citizen mistakenly accepted, leading to long legal battles and eventually deportation. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
February 10, 2020 - 2:33 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The day Margarita Del Pilar Fitzpatrick applied for an Illinois driver's license upended her life. When a clerk offered to register her to vote in 2005, the Peruvian citizen mistakenly accepted, leading to long legal battles and eventually deportation. A decade and a half later, she...
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In this Jan. 31, 2020, photo, Ann Lovell carries her box of prescriptions after returning to Salt Lake City International Airport following her visit to Tijuana, Mexico. Lovell travels every few months to Tijuana, Mexico, to buy medication for rheumatoid arthritis with tickets paid for by the state of Utah's public insurer. Lovell is one of about 10 state workers participating in a year-old program to lower prescription drug costs by having public employees buy their medication in Mexico at a steep discount compared to U.S. prices. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
February 09, 2020 - 10:56 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Ann Lovell had never owned a passport before last year. Now, the 62-year-old teacher is a frequent flier, traveling every few months to Tijuana, Mexico, to buy medication for rheumatoid arthritis — with tickets paid for by the state of Utah’s public insurer. Lovell is one of...
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January 30, 2020 - 6:47 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Major League Baseball's involvement in the sale of tickets for Roger Waters' North American tour has been criticized by the leadership of the Jewish advocacy organization B'nai B'rith International. Tickets went on sale this week for Waters' "This is Not a Drill" tour, which...
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January 30, 2020 - 4:17 pm
The U.S. Census Bureau is relying on outside help from social media companies, advocacy groups and other government agencies to halt campaigns that try to discourage people from participating in the once-a-decade head count through the spread of false information, officials said Thursday. Because...
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In this March 5, 2015 photo, Isabel dos Santos, reputedly Africa's richest woman, attends the opening of an art exhibition featuring works from the collection of her husband and art collector Sindika Dokolo in Porto, Portugal. On Monday, Jan. 6, 2020, Angola's foreign minister Manuel Augusto said that there is no political motivation behind the government's demand for more than $1 billion from dos Santos, her husband and a Portuguese business partner. Isabel dos Santos is a daughter of Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who ruled the oil- and diamond-rich nation for 38 years until 2017. (AP Photo/Paulo Duarte)
January 27, 2020 - 6:12 am
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — A Portuguese hacker is claiming responsibility for leaking confidential documents implicating the billionaire daughter of a former prominent African leader in alleged murky international business deals. Lawyers for Rui Pinto, who is in a Lisbon jail awaiting trial in a...
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FILE - This Sept. 6, 2012, file photo shows the Amazon logo in Santa Monica, Calif. Hundreds of employees are openly criticizing Amazon's record on climate change despite what they say is a company policy that puts their jobs at risk for speaking out. On Sunday, Jan. 26, 2020, more than 300 employees of the online retail giant signed their names and job titles to statements on blog post on Medium. The online protest was organized by a group called Amazon Employees For Climate Justice, an advocacy group founded by Amazon workers that earlier this month. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
January 26, 2020 - 9:34 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Hundreds of employees are openly criticizing Amazon's record on climate change despite what they say is a company policy that puts their jobs at risk for speaking out. On Sunday, more than 300 employees of the online retail giant signed their names and job titles to statements...
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January 21, 2020 - 4:59 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Four thoroughbred racehorses were euthanized after competing at a New Orleans track in a 10 -day span, prompting criticism from an animal advocacy group based in Washington D.C. Officials at the New Orleans Fair Grounds Race Course didn't specify the circumstances surrounding the...
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Karina Shumate, 21, a college student studying stenography, fills out a voter registration form in Richardson, Texas, Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020. Democrats are hoping this is the year they can finally make political headway in Texas and have set their sights on trying to win a majority in one house of the state Legislature. Among the hurdles they'll have to overcome are a series of voting restrictions Texas Republicans have implemented in recent years, including the nation's toughest voter ID law, purging of voter rolls and reductions in polling places. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
January 19, 2020 - 9:13 am
Democrats believe they have a shot at making gains this year in Republican-dominated Texas, including winning control of one house of the Legislature for the first time in nearly two decades. Persuading voters isn't their only challenge. Voting and registration rules crafted by Republicans in...
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FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, lawyers and youth plaintiffs lineup behind a banner after a hearing before Federal District Court Judge Ann Aiken between lawyers for the Trump Administration and the so called Climate Kids in Federal Court in Eugene, Ore. A federal appeals court on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020, dismissed a lawsuit by 21 young people who claimed the U.S. government's climate policy harms them and jeopardizes their future. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard via AP, File)
January 17, 2020 - 4:24 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Friday dismissed a lawsuit by 21 young people who claimed the U.S. government's climate policies and reliance on fossil fuels harms them, jeopardizes their future and violates their constitutional rights, potentially bringing an end to a long-running...
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