Special interest groups

FILE - In this April 21, 2017, file photo, trademark applications from Ivanka Trump Marks LLC images taken off the website of China's trademark database are displayed next to a Chinese online shopping website selling purported Ivanka Trump branded footwear on computer screens in Beijing, China. Three men investigating a company in China that produces Ivanka Trump brand shoes are missing, according to Li Qiang who runs China Labor Watch, a New York-based labor rights group that was planning to publish a report in June, 2017, about low pay, excessive overtime and the possible misuse of student interns at one of the company's factories. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
May 30, 2017 - 9:07 pm
SHANGHAI (AP) — A man investigating working conditions at a Chinese company that produces Ivanka Trump-brand shoes has been arrested and two others are missing, the arrested man's wife and an advocacy group said Tuesday. Hua Haifeng was accused of illegal surveillance, according to his wife, Deng...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2017, file photo, trademark applications from Ivanka Trump Marks LLC images taken off the website of China's trademark database are displayed next to a Chinese online shopping website selling purported Ivanka Trump branded footwear on computer screens in Beijing, China. Three men investigating a company in China that produces Ivanka Trump brand shoes are missing, according to Li Qiang who runs China Labor Watch, a New York-based labor rights group that was planning to publish a report in June, 2017, about low pay, excessive overtime and the possible misuse of student interns at one of the company's factories. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
May 30, 2017 - 7:14 pm
SHANGHAI (AP) — A man investigating working conditions at a Chinese company that produces Ivanka Trump-brand shoes has been arrested and two others are missing, the arrested man's wife and an advocacy group said Tuesday. Hua Haifeng was accused of illegal surveillance, according to his wife, Deng...
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In this May 23, 2017, photo0, Budget Director Mick Mulvaney holds up a copy of President Donald Trump's proposed fiscal 2018 federal budget as he speaks to members of the media in the Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Advocates for minority communities say President Donald Trump’s budget proposal answers the question he famously posed to black Americans during his campaign: “What the hell do you have to lose?” His $4.1 trillion plan for the budget year beginning Oct. 1 generally proposes deep cuts in safety net programs, including Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
May 28, 2017 - 8:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Advocates for minority communities say President Donald Trump's proposed budget answers the question he famously posed to black Americans during his campaign: "What the hell do you have to lose?" His $4.1 trillion spending plan for the budget year beginning Oct. 1 generally makes...
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In this 2013 photo provided by Kraig Moss, Moss, left, poses with son, Rob, in their Owego, N.Y. home. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looked Moss in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son Rob two years earlier. But Trump released a federal budget proposal Tuesday, May 23, 2017, that would cut insurance coverage for addiction treatment and funding for research and prevention. (Moss Family Photo via AP)
May 26, 2017 - 8:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — He slept next to his son's ashes most nights back when Kraig Moss first met Donald Trump. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, the presidential candidate looked the middle-aged truck driver visiting from upstate New York in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his...
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In this 2013 photo provided by Kraig Moss, Moss, left, poses with son, Rob, in their Owego, N.Y. home. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looked Moss in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son Rob two years earlier. But Trump released a federal budget proposal Tuesday, May 23, 2017, that would cut insurance coverage for addiction treatment and funding for research and prevention. (Moss Family Photo via AP)
May 26, 2017 - 4:10 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — He slept next to his son's ashes most nights back when Kraig Moss first met Donald Trump. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, the presidential candidate looked the middle-aged truck driver in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son two years earlier. "He...
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In this 2013 photo provided by Kraig Moss, Moss, left, poses with son, Rob, in their Owego, N.Y. home. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looked Moss in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son Rob two years earlier. But Trump released a federal budget proposal Tuesday, May 23, 2017, that would cut insurance coverage for addiction treatment and funding for research and prevention. (Moss Family Photo via AP)
May 26, 2017 - 9:20 am
NEW YORK (AP) — He slept next to his son's ashes most nights back when Kraig Moss first met Donald Trump. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, the presidential candidate looked the middle-aged truck driver in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son two years earlier. "He...
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FILE - In this March 1, 2016 file photo, Kraig Moss plays a song for attendees as they wait in line before the arrival of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump ahead of a campaign stop at the Signature Flight Hangar at Port-Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio. "He promised me, in honor of my son, that he was going to combat the ongoing heroin epidemic," Moss said of a January 2016 presidential campaign interaction with Trump. Trump's budget proposal released Tuesday, May 23, 2017, weakens insurance coverage for drug addiction treatment and cuts back funding for research and prevention programs. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
May 26, 2017 - 1:17 am
NEW YORK (AP) — He slept next to his son's ashes most nights back when Kraig Moss first met Donald Trump. In a hall packed with Iowa voters, the presidential candidate looked the middle-aged truck driver in the eye and vowed to fight the opioid crisis that killed his only son two years earlier. "He...
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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, left, joined by Education Department Budget Service Director Erica Navarro, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 24, 2017, before the House Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies subcommittee hearing on the Education Department's fiscal 2018 budget. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
May 24, 2017 - 3:27 pm
President Donald Trump's budget proposal to provide federal tax money for private-school scholarships is getting pushback from an unconventional source: groups known for promoting school-choice initiatives. The plan promoted by Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos widened a divide in the...
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Cincinnati Bengals second-round draft pick Joe Mixon speaks during a news conference at Paul Brown Stadium, Saturday, April 29, 2017, in Cincinnati. The former Oklahoma running back was selected as the 48th overall pick. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
May 02, 2017 - 4:55 pm
CINCINNATI (AP) — An advocacy group is urging the Cincinnati Bengals to speak out against domestic violence after the team drafted a player who punched a woman in the face. Women Helping Women called on the team to take a public stand against domestic violence and sexual assault. The Bengals chose...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to talk about the failed health care bill. “Obamacare” is showing surprising staying power, thanks in large part to doctors, hospitals and other health industry players opposing Republican alternatives thus far. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
May 01, 2017 - 4:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — "Obamacare" is showing surprising staying power, thanks in large part to doctors, hospitals and other health industry players opposing the alternatives that Republicans have proposed. The stories and perspectives they bring to the debate are grounded in the local community and the...
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