Species conservation and preservation

FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, John Miano of Destin, Fla., holds a monarch butterfly on his fingertip as he waits for the newly tagged insect to take flight during the Panhandle Butterfly House's Monarch Madness festival in Navarre, Fla. The Trump administration is proposing changes to the government's endangered species program that wildlife advocates say could make it harder to protect monarchs. (Devon Ravine/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP, File)
July 19, 2018 - 6:43 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animals and plants and limiting habitat safeguards meant to shield recovering species from harm. Administration officials said the new rules would advance conservation by simplifying and...
Read More
FILE - In this April 20, 2013 file photo, male greater sage grouse perform mating rituals for a female grouse, not pictured, on a lake outside Walden, Colo. In an abrupt reversal, the Pentagon now says it supports a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
July 19, 2018 - 6:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In an abrupt reversal, the Pentagon said Thursday it supports a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. In an email to Congress...
Read More
July 18, 2018 - 6:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is objecting to a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. The Defense Department says in a position paper made...
Read More
In this Oct. 30, 2017, photo provided by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Wildlife Biologist Jason Hawley affixes a GPS tracking collar on a bobcat at the Sessions Woods Wildlife Management in Burlington, Conn. GPS collars were placed on several dozen bobcats in the fall of 2017 to track their movements. The collars are programmed to fall off on and after Aug. 1, 2018. The agency wants to find all the collars, recharge the batteries and place them on other bobcats in the fall to continue the study. (Paul Fusco/Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection via AP)
July 14, 2018 - 8:00 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — In a couple of weeks, collars on cats across the state will be falling off. But it's not some prank or devious experiment — it's one of the largest studies of its kind on bobcats. The GPS collars were placed on 50 bobcats last fall as part of research by wildlife biologists...
Read More
FILE - In this file photo taken on Saturday Jan.14, 2006, a 4-year old Female black Rhino, runs after it was darted at Nairobi National Park. A Kenyan wildlife official on Friday, July 13, 2018 says seven critically endangered black rhinos are dead following an attempt to move them from the capital to a national park hundreds of kilometers away. (AP Photo/Sayyid Abdul Azim, File)
July 13, 2018 - 10:59 am
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Eight critically endangered black rhinos are dead in Kenya after wildlife workers moved them from the capital to a new national park, the government said Friday, calling the toll "unprecedented" in more than a decade of such transfers. Preliminary investigations point to salt...
Read More
July 10, 2018 - 6:21 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Wildlife rangers said Tuesday that they had trapped a 4.7-meter (15-foot) saltwater crocodile, the largest they had ever caught in the northern Australian Katherine River and in an upstream region popular with tourists that is thought relatively safe from the killer...
Read More
FILE -- In this Friday, March 2, 2018 photo Keeper Zachariah Mutai attends to Fatu, one of only two female northern white rhinos left in the world, in the pen where she is kept for observation, at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia county in Kenya. Scientist say they're several steps closer to perfecting a method for stopping the extinction of northern white rhinos. Writing in the journal Nature Communications, researchers said Wednesday they’ve succeeded in creating embryos using frozen northern white rhino sperm and eggs from a southern white rhino. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
July 04, 2018 - 2:35 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they're several steps closer to perfecting a method that could prevent the extinction of northern white rhinos, of which only two animals are known still to be alive. According to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers have...
Read More
A pair of brown pelicans head for San Francisco Bay after being released at Fort Baker with the Golden Gate Bridge in the background Friday, June 29, 2018, in Sausalito, Calif. Seven young brown pelicans were released into the wild in Northern California after spending weeks at an aviary recovering from malnutrition. Russ Curtis of International Bird Rescue said the birds noted for their large, pointy beaks are among more than 80 sick and starving pelicans taken in by the group throughout the state since April. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
June 29, 2018 - 5:17 pm
SAUSALITO, Calif. (AP) — Seven young brown pelicans have been released into the wild in Northern California after spending weeks at an aviary recovering from malnutrition. Russ Curtis of International Bird Rescue says the birds noted for their large, pointy beaks were returned to a beach Friday in...
Read More
June 19, 2018 - 8:08 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — An Idaho couple has sued the U.S. government, saying their teenage son still suffers headaches after a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed near their home doused him with cyanide. Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S...
Read More
In this Nov. 8, 2013 file photo, boats move along the Chicago River near the Trump International Hotel and Tower, center, in Chicago. The Trump Tower is among the largest users of water from the Chicago River, but records show it has never met Environmental Protection Agency rules for protecting fish. City records indicate the skyscraper siphons nearly 20 million gallons a day for its cooling systems. Regulations limit the number of fish that can be trapped or killed during that processes. Records show Trump Tower has failed to document it followed those rules. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato File)
June 18, 2018 - 3:18 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The Trump International Hotel & Tower in Chicago is one of the largest users of water from the Chicago River, but records show it has never followed state rules governing the protection of the river's fish. State records indicate that the skyscraper siphons nearly 20 million...
Read More

Pages