State courts

Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B, right, waves at fans as she arrives for a hearing at Queens County Criminal Court, Tuesday, June 25, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
June 25, 2019 - 7:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B was arraigned Tuesday on new felony charges in connection with a fight last year at a New York City strip club. "Not guilty, sir, honor," said the rapper dressed in a dark blue and light pink pantsuit with her hair tinted blue as she pleaded in state...
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FILE - This Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, shows a former iron ore processing plant near Hoyt Lakes, Minn., that would become part of a proposed PolyMet copper-nickel mine. Environmental Protection Agency documents show that its staffers were critical of how Minnesota regulators drafted a key permit for the planned PolyMet copper-nickel mine. And they show the EPA officials concluded the permit would violate federal law because it lacked specific water pollution limits. The EPA released the documents after a court challenge by WaterLegacy. Environmental attorney Paula Maccabee says the EPA's concerns weren't reflected in PolyMet's final water pollution permit. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
June 25, 2019 - 6:39 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A district court must determine if state environmental regulators improperly sought to suppress a federal agency's serious concerns about the pollution risks arising from a proposed copper-nickel mine in northern Minnesota, the state Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday. The St. Paul-...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 9:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 22, 2019 - 2:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018 file photo, Pennsylvania resident Rose Mary Knick stands next to a private property sign on her farmland in Lackawanna County's Scott Township. The Supreme Court is siding with Knick in a case that gives citizens another avenue to pursue claims when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights. The high court ruled Friday in the case. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
June 21, 2019 - 3:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Friday to allow people to sue in federal court when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights, handing a victory to a Pennsylvania woman fighting her town over a cemetery ordinance. The high court ruled 5-4 along...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2018, file photo, then Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at a news conference in Madison, Wis. Wisconsin's conservative-controlled Supreme Court on Friday, June 21, 2019, upheld lame-duck laws limiting the powers of Democratic Gov. Evers and Attorney General Josh Kaul, handing Republican lawmakers a resounding victory. (AP Photo/Scott Bauer, File)
June 21, 2019 - 2:05 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Democrats trying to undo laws passed by Republicans during a lame-duck session just before Gov. Scott Walker left office are putting their hopes behind a federal court challenge following a resounding legal defeat Friday. The conservative-controlled Wisconsin Supreme...
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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2019 file photo, visitors walk around the 40-foot Maryland Peace Cross dedicated to World War I soldiers in Bladensburg, Md. The Supreme Court says the World War I memorial in the shape of a 40-foot-tall cross can continue to stand on public land in Maryland. The high court on Thursday rejected a challenge to the nearly 100-year-old memorial. The justices ruled that its presence on public land doesn’t violate the First Amendment’s establishment clause. That clause prohibits the government from favoring one religion over others.(AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
June 20, 2019 - 4:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A 40-foot-tall, World War I memorial cross can continue to stand on public land in Maryland, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in an important decision about the use of religious symbols in American life. The justices said preserving a long-standing religious monument is very...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2018, file photo, Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring attends a news conference in Washington. Virginians will elect members of the House of Delegates this year using a map seen as favorable to Democrats, according to a ruling Monday, June 17, 2019 by the U.S. Supreme Court. Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat, called the ruling a “big win for democracy in Virginia.” (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 17, 2019 - 3:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Virginians will elect members of the House of Delegates this year using a map seen as favorable to Democrats as a result of a ruling Monday by the U.S. Supreme Court. The political boundaries are important because Republicans currently control the House by a slim majority. Only...
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FILE- This Feb. 5, 2013, file photo, shows exterior of the now closed Sweet Cakes by Melissa in Gresham, Ore. The Supreme Court is throwing out an Oregon court ruling against bakers who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. The move keeps the high-profile case off the court’s election-year calendar and orders state judges to take a new look at the dispute between the lesbian couple and the owners of a now-closed bakery. The justices already have agreed to decide whether federal civil rights law protects people from job discrimination due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. (Everton Bailey Jr./The Oregonian via AP)
June 17, 2019 - 12:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court decided Monday against a high-stakes, election-year case about the competing rights of gay and lesbian couples and merchants who refuse to provide services for same-sex weddings. The justices handed bakers in the Portland, Oregon, area a small victory by throwing...
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FILE - This Dec. 13, 2016, file photo, shows the former Anaconda smelter smokestack behind sculptures of miners at the Anaconda Smelter Stack State Park viewing area in Anaconda, Montana. Residents in the nearby community of Opportunity are suing to get the Atlantic Richfield Co. to do a more thorough cleanup of arsenic in residential yards. The Montana Supreme Court ruled in December 2017 that they could move forward with their 2008 lawsuit. Arco appealed, arguing a state lawsuit shouldn't be able to interfere with an ongoing cleanup. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday, June 10, 2019, it will hear the appeal. (AP Photo/Matt Volz, File)
June 10, 2019 - 2:45 pm
BUTTE, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether residents of two Montana communities can continue their decade-long effort to get the Atlantic Richfield Co. to pay for a more thorough cleanup of arsenic left on properties after a century of copper smelting. The Montana Supreme Court...
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