Supreme courts

In this Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020 photo, Singer Gloria Estefan moderates a presentation with Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor in Miami. Sotomayor spoke to a crowd about her new book "Just Ask". The new illustrated book teaches children and parents how to be better citizens by explaining that acts of civic participation turn people into heroes. (AP Photo/Adriana Gomez Licon)
January 29, 2020 - 12:21 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor wants young children to think of citizenship in a different way. The justice sat down with Grammy Award winning singer Gloria Estefan in Miami and told a crowd of hundreds about the idea for her next children's book, which will be about civic...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
January 29, 2020 - 6:51 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — With opening arguments wrapped up in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, senators will now get a chance to ask questions. But the normally loquacious politicians will still have to keep silent, as their questions can only be submitted in writing. The question-and-answer...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2017 file photo, demonstrators carrying signs chant as they protest outside of the White House in Washington during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is headed back to a federal appeals court, three years after it was first imposed. On Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2020, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond is scheduled to hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents whose relatives have been unable to enter the U.S. because of the ban. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
January 28, 2020 - 2:36 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A federal appeals court appeared skeptical Tuesday as civil rights groups sought to allow legal challenges to President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries to move forward despite a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding the ban. The ban, put...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
AP News
January 27, 2020 - 5:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place new rules that could jeopardize permanent resident status for immigrants who use food stamps, Medicaid and housing vouchers. Under the new policy, immigration officials can deny green cards to legal...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2017 file photo, demonstrators carrying signs chant as they protest outside of the White House in Washington during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is headed back to a federal appeals court, three years after it was first imposed. On Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2020, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond is scheduled to hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents whose relatives have been unable to enter the U.S. because of the ban. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
AP News
January 26, 2020 - 9:25 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — After the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from several predominantly Muslim countries in 2018, the ruling appeared to shut down legal challenges that claimed the policy was rooted in anti-Muslim bias. But a federal appeals court in Richmond...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts admonishes the impeachment managers and president's counsel in equal terms as he speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. Roberts asked them to "avoid speaking in a manner and using language that is not conducive to civil discourse." (Senate Television via AP)
January 24, 2020 - 3:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court doesn't have a public comment line for its own work, much less the Senate's. That hasn't stopped a fair number of social media users from urging people to call Chief Justice John Roberts at the Supreme Court and demand a fair trial or ask for witnesses or tell...
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People holding a Poland and European Union flags take part in a protest outside Poland's parliament building as lawmakers voted to approve the much-criticized legislation that allows politicians to fire judges who criticize their decisions, in Warsaw, Poland, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. Poland's lawmakers gave their final approval Thursday to legislation that will allow politicians to fire judges who criticize their decisions, a change that European legal experts warn will undermine judicial independence. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
January 24, 2020 - 12:51 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Legal chaos has deepened dramatically in Poland, with the government and the country’s high court judges clashing over who administers justice — a rift that some experts say is an assault on the young democracy and could lead to a break from the European Union. The right-wing...
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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, arrives at the Capitol in Washington during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
January 23, 2020 - 6:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts' admonishment of House impeachment prosecutors and President Donald Trump's defense team followed a handwritten note by Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine. Collins penned a note after House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler's...
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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., left, arrives at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. The U.S. Senate plunges into President Donald Trump's impeachment trial with Republicans abruptly abandoning plans to cram opening arguments into two days but solidly rejecting for now Democratic demands for more witnesses to expose what they deem Trump's "trifecta" of offenses. Trump himself claims he wants top aides to testify, but qualified that by suggesting there were "national security" concerns to allowing their testimony. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
January 22, 2020 - 2:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The four Democratic senators seeking the White House want to be out there campaigning, but they’re pulled off the presidential campaign trail and into the Senate to serve as jurors in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. That means forgoing raucous events and adoring crowds...
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This July 31, 2019 photo shows Stillwater Christian School parents Jeri Anderson and Kendra Espinoza at Woodland Park in Kalispell, Mont. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 in a dispute over a Montana scholarship program for private K-12 education that also makes donors eligible for up to $150 in state tax credits. Advocates on both sides say the outcome could be momentous because it could lead to efforts in other states to funnel taxpayer money to religious schools. (Casey Kreider/The Daily Inter Lake via AP)
January 22, 2020 - 1:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's conservative majority appeared ready Wednesday to reinvigorate a Montana scholarship program and make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. The court was sharply divided along ideological lines in arguments over a...
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