Temporary workers

Karan Murgai, an IT management consultant for a multinational based in Dallas, poses for a photograph next to then portrait of his father Satish Murgai, in his Delhi house, in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, June 30, 2020. Murgai came to Delhi in March this year after his father died. Murgai and at least 1,000 others like him, whose U.S. visas are tied to their jobs in the U.S., are now stranded in India, after an executive order signed by President Donald Trump that suspends applications for H-1B and other high-skilled work visas from abroad. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
July 03, 2020 - 1:05 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — The March day that his father died, Karan Murgai boarded a plane to India. The coronavirus was spreading, so Murgai's wife and their two young children stayed home in Dallas. Their separation — due to last three weeks — became indefinite after President Donald Trump signed an...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2017, file photo, a flag is waved outside the White House, in Washington. The Trump administration is extending a ban on green cards issued outside the United States until the end of 202 and adding many temporary work visas to the freeze, including those used heavily by technology companies and multinational corporations. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
June 22, 2020 - 9:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Monday extended a ban on green cards issued outside the United States until the end of the year and added many temporary work visas to the freeze, including those used heavily by technology companies and multinational corporations. The administration...
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In this June 12, 2020, photo, Gregory Minott stands in front of Town Hall in Andover, Mass. Minott came to the U.S. from his native Jamaica more than two decades ago on a student visa and was able to carve out a career in architecture thanks to temporary work visas. Now a U.S. citizen and co-founder of a real estate development firm in Boston, he worries that new restrictions on student and work visas expected to be announced soon will prevent others from following a similar path to the American dream. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
June 16, 2020 - 5:30 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Gregory Minott came to the U.S. from his native Jamaica more than two decades ago on a student visa and was able to carve out a career in architecture thanks to temporary work visas. Now a U.S. citizen and co-founder of a real estate development firm in Boston, the 43-year-old worries...
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In this photo provided by Cristobal Francisquez, his parents Paulina and Marcos Francisco pose for a photo in front of their house in Sioux City, Iowa, Monday, May 25, 2020. They bought the home after years of working in a meatpacking plant and other food processing jobs. (Cristobal Francisquez via AP)
May 26, 2020 - 7:06 am
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — When Martha Kebede’s adult sons immigrated from Ethiopia and reunited with her in South Dakota this year, they had few work opportunities. Lacking English skills, the brothers took jobs at Smithfield Foods' Sioux Falls pork plant, grueling and increasingly risky work as the...
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May 17, 2020 - 6:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government agency that processes citizenship applications and work visas is running out of money because of the COVID-19 pandemic and says it needs to raise its fees and receive emergency funding from Congress to stay afloat. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is...
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FILE - In this June 15, 2018 photo, winter wheat is harvested in a field farmed by Dalton and Carson North near McCracken, Kan. With the start of the winter wheat harvest just weeks ago, U.S. custom harvesters are having problems getting into the country the foreign workers they usually rely on to run their combines. The shuttered embassies amid the global coronavirus outbreak is just the start of difficulties: Governments have closed down their borders and overseas workers who already have visas already simply cannot get a flight. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
May 09, 2020 - 8:33 am
BELLE PLAINE, Kan. (AP) — Kansas harvester Mike Keimig is growing increasingly anxious about whether the foreign seasonal workers he needs to run his nine combines and drive his grain trucks will arrive in time for the start of the winter wheat harvest, which is just weeks away. His regular crew...
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In this April 7, 2020, photo provided by Maribel Torres, Maribel Torres sews face masks masks to be used for protection against the coronavirus at her home in the Staten Island borough of New York. Torres used to clean apartments but tenants stopped calling her when the pandemic started. Now, with support from La Colmena, a non-profit that helps day laborers, she is sewing masks from home and selling some of them. (Pablo Evangelista/Torres Family Photo via AP)
May 01, 2020 - 2:57 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Ulises García went from being a waiter to working at a laundromat. Yelitza Esteva used to do manicures and now delivers groceries. Maribel Torres swapped cleaning homes for sewing masks. The coronavirus pandemic has devastated sectors of the economy dominated by immigrant labor:...
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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Tuesday, April 21, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
April 21, 2020 - 10:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced what he described as a “temporary suspension of immigration into the United States” on Tuesday. But the executive order would bar only those seeking permanent residency, not temporary workers. Trump said he would be placing a 60-day pause on the...
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April 07, 2020 - 4:49 pm
BERLIN (AP) — The Qatari government said Tuesday it has implemented widespread measures to protect immigrant workers from the coronavirus, after a German documentary highlighted that ongoing construction of World Cup infrastructure raised the risk of infections. The government said in a statement...
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In this August 2019, photo released by Florian Hayek, Courtney Huang, a Chinese citizen living and working in the United States, poses for a photo in the Central Library in Seattle, Wa. Huang is one of hundreds of Chinese whose jobs, lives, and right to work in the U.S. are on the line after the Trump administration imposed a travel ban and visa processing halt on foreigners in China over the coronavirus outbreak. Huang, who aspires to become a U.S. citizen, is worried that she could lose her job and her right to live in the States because her work visa wasn't issued due to the halt. (Florian Hayek via AP)
March 14, 2020 - 12:41 am
BEIJING (AP) — Courtney Huang fell in love with the U.S. as a nursing student in Texas. She ended up staying 13 years and wants to become a U.S. citizen. But Huang now finds her job, future, and dreams of citizenship on the line since the Trump administration barred entry last month to non-U.S...
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