Tobacco industry regulation

This image provided by the Food and Drug Administration shows packages of e-liquid nicotine, at left and juice boxes on the right. The US Food and Drug Administration issued warnings Tuesday, May 1, 2018, to more than a dozen makers of liquid nicotine for packaging their vaping formulas to resemble children’s juice boxes, candies and cookies. (FDA via AP)
May 01, 2018 - 1:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Liquid nicotine products that look like juice boxes, candies and other kids' snacks came under government scrutiny Tuesday, as health authorities warned they could pose a danger to children. The Food and Drug Administration issued more than a dozen warnings over the illegal...
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FILE - In Dec. 8, 2009 file photo, Newport cigarettes, a Lorillard Inc. brand, are displayed at Costco in Mountain View, Calif. Federal health officials are taking a closer look at flavors in tobacco products that appeal to young people, particularly menthol-flavored cigarettes, which have escaped regulation despite nearly a decade of government scrutiny. The Food and Drug Administration issued a call Tuesday, March 20, 2018, for more information about flavored tobacco products, with the aim of preventing children and young people from getting hooked on nicotine. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
March 20, 2018 - 2:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials are taking a closer look at flavors in tobacco products that appeal to young people, particularly menthol-flavored cigarettes, which have escaped regulation despite nearly a decade of government scrutiny. The Food and Drug Administration issued a call...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 file photo, test cigarettes sit in a smoking machine in a lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. On Wednesday, March 14, 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a sweeping anti-smoking plan to drastically cut nicotine levels in cigarettes. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
March 15, 2018 - 6:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials took the first step Thursday to slash levels of addictive nicotine in cigarettes, an unprecedented move designed to help smokers quit and prevent future generations from getting hooked. The Food and Drug Administration floated the proposal last summer, but...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump administration is proposing banning bump stocks, which allow guns to mimic fully automatic fire and were used in last year's Las Vegas massacre. The Justice Department's regulation, announced Saturday, March 10, 2018, would classify the device as a machine gun prohibited under federal law. The move was expected after President Donald Trump ordered officials to work toward a ban after 17 people were killed at a Florida high school. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
March 10, 2018 - 6:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Saturday it has taken the first step in the regulatory process to ban bump stocks, likely setting the stage for long legal battles with gun manufacturers while the trigger devices remain on the market. The move was expected after President Donald...
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President Donald Trump speaks as he hosts a listening session with high school students, teachers and parents in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
February 22, 2018 - 12:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has ordered his Justice Department to work toward banning rapid-fire bump stocks like the ones used in last year's Las Vegas massacre— but officials aren't sure they can. Trump's surprise order this week comes as officials from the department's Bureau of...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. U.S. government experts have rejected a proposal from Philip Morris International to sell its "heat-not-burn" tobacco device as a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes that reduces disease. But the panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration endorsed a lesser claim that the product reduces exposure to harmful chemicals in cigarettes. The mixed review suggests Philip Morris will be able to market its device to U.S. smokers, but on limited terms. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 25, 2018 - 5:06 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Government advisers dealt a blow Thursday to Philip Morris International's hopes to sell its heat-not-burn device in the United States as a less-harmful alternative to cigarettes. The penlike device heats Marlboro-branded sticks of tobacco but stops short of burning them...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 22, 2018 - 4:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A device that heats tobacco without burning it reduces some of the harmful chemicals in traditional cigarettes, but government scientists say it's unclear if that translates into lower rates of disease for smokers who switch. U.S. regulators published a mixed review Monday of the...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 19, 2018 - 12:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Imagine if cigarettes were no longer addictive and smoking itself became almost obsolete; only a tiny segment of Americans still lit up. That's the goal of an unprecedented anti-smoking plan being carefully fashioned by U.S. health officials. But the proposal from the Food and...
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FILE - This Friday, April 7, 2017, file photo, shows cigarette butts discarded in an ashtray outside a New York office building. Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies are returning to prime-time television, but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
November 21, 2017 - 3:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11...
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People dressed as zombies film a short movie for Together Oklahoma in protest of the state's budget situation outside the state Capitol in Oklahoma City, Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017. (Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman via AP)
October 21, 2017 - 6:54 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Anti-tax "zombies" in Oklahoma were stopped outside the entrance to the state Capitol on Saturday in a staged event by groups supporting tax increases to prevent cuts to health, education and other services. The event by Together Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Policy Institute was...
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