Tobacco industry regulation

President Donald Trump speaks as he hosts a listening session with high school students, teachers and parents in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
February 22, 2018 - 12:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has ordered his Justice Department to work toward banning rapid-fire bump stocks like the ones used in last year's Las Vegas massacre— but officials aren't sure they can. Trump's surprise order this week comes as officials from the department's Bureau of...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. U.S. government experts have rejected a proposal from Philip Morris International to sell its "heat-not-burn" tobacco device as a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes that reduces disease. But the panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration endorsed a lesser claim that the product reduces exposure to harmful chemicals in cigarettes. The mixed review suggests Philip Morris will be able to market its device to U.S. smokers, but on limited terms. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 25, 2018 - 5:06 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Government advisers dealt a blow Thursday to Philip Morris International's hopes to sell its heat-not-burn device in the United States as a less-harmful alternative to cigarettes. The penlike device heats Marlboro-branded sticks of tobacco but stops short of burning them...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 22, 2018 - 4:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A device that heats tobacco without burning it reduces some of the harmful chemicals in traditional cigarettes, but government scientists say it's unclear if that translates into lower rates of disease for smokers who switch. U.S. regulators published a mixed review Monday of the...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 19, 2018 - 12:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Imagine if cigarettes were no longer addictive and smoking itself became almost obsolete; only a tiny segment of Americans still lit up. That's the goal of an unprecedented anti-smoking plan being carefully fashioned by U.S. health officials. But the proposal from the Food and...
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FILE - This Friday, April 7, 2017, file photo, shows cigarette butts discarded in an ashtray outside a New York office building. Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies are returning to prime-time television, but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
November 21, 2017 - 3:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11...
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People dressed as zombies film a short movie for Together Oklahoma in protest of the state's budget situation outside the state Capitol in Oklahoma City, Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017. (Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman via AP)
October 21, 2017 - 6:54 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Anti-tax "zombies" in Oklahoma were stopped outside the entrance to the state Capitol on Saturday in a staged event by groups supporting tax increases to prevent cuts to health, education and other services. The event by Together Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Policy Institute was...
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In this Oct. 4, 2017, photo, a device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. The National Rifle Association announced its support Ton Oct. 5 for regulating the devices that can effectively convert semi-automatic rifles into fully automated weapons and that were apparently used in the Las Vegas massacre to lethal effect. It was a surprising shift for the leading gun industry group, which in recent years has resolutely opposed any gun regulations. Immediately afterward the White House, too, said it was open to such a change. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
October 06, 2017 - 4:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not every day — or every year or every decade — you see Republicans raising questions about whether Democrats were tough enough on gun control when they were in power. Such is the case now as political debate stirs over a regulatory decision approving the use of "bump stocks...
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August 07, 2017 - 9:59 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Placing much of the blame on smoking, a study chronicling the ongoing health crisis in Appalachia has concluded that the 13-state region suffers from a growing disparity in infant mortality and life expectancy, two key indicators of "a nation's health and well-being." The...
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In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 photo, test cigarettes sit in a smoking machine in a lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. On Friday, July 28, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it wants to lower nicotine levels in cigarettes so they aren't so addictive. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
July 28, 2017 - 5:27 pm
For the first time, the federal government is proposing cutting the nicotine level in cigarettes so they aren't so addictive. U.S. Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb on Friday directed the agency's staff to develop new regulations on nicotine. The FDA has had the power since 2009 to...
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