Tobacco products manufacturing

FILE - In this Oct. 27, 2015, file photo, a University of Washington student discards a cigarette into a container at a designated smoking locations on the campus in Seattle. Seventeen public health schools in the U.S. and Canada have pledged to refuse research money from a new anti-smoking group funded by the tobacco industry. Deans of public health schools at Harvard, Johns Hopkins and a dozen other schools said Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, that the group is too closely tied to an industry that sells harmful products. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 25, 2018 - 4:56 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Seventeen public health schools in the U.S. and Canada pledged Thursday to refuse research money from a new anti-smoking group funded by the tobacco industry. The Foundation for a Smoke-Free World was created in September with nearly $1 billion from the Philip Morris tobacco company,...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016 file photo, a doctor holds an e-cigarette in a smoking lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. An exhaustive government report issued Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 wrestles with the potential benefits and harms of the vapor-emitting devices, which remain unclear more than a decade after their introduction in the U.S. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)
January 23, 2018 - 3:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Electronic cigarettes could be a boon to public health or a major liability, depending on whether they help Americans quit smoking or encourage more young people to try traditional cigarettes, a new report concludes. The report issued Tuesday wrestles with the potential benefits...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 22, 2018 - 4:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A device that heats tobacco without burning it reduces some of the harmful chemicals in traditional cigarettes, but government scientists say it's unclear if that translates into lower rates of disease for smokers who switch. U.S. regulators published a mixed review Monday of the...
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This undated image provided by Philip Morris in January 2018 shows the company's iQOS product. The device heats tobacco sticks but stops short of burning them, an approach that Philip Morris says reduces exposure to tar and other toxic byproducts of burning cigarettes. This is different from e-cigarettes, which don’t use tobacco at all but instead vaporize liquid usually containing nicotine. (Philip Morris via AP)
January 19, 2018 - 12:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Imagine if cigarettes were no longer addictive and smoking itself became almost obsolete; only a tiny segment of Americans still lit up. That's the goal of an unprecedented anti-smoking plan being carefully fashioned by U.S. health officials. But the proposal from the Food and...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011 file photo, Reynolds American cigarette brand American Spirit are on display at a liquor store in Palo Alto, Calif. A U.S. judge in New Mexico has dismissed more than two dozen complaints against the maker of American Spirit cigarettes but is allowing others to move forward over a line of tobacco touted as natural. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
December 29, 2017 - 4:39 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A U.S. judge in New Mexico has dismissed more than two dozen complaints against the maker of American Spirit cigarettes but is allowing others to move forward over a line of tobacco touted as natural. Scores of plaintiffs from at least a dozen states sued Santa Fe Natural...
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December 28, 2017 - 4:03 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A judge in Florida ordered R.J. Reynolds to continue paying the state millions of dollars in tobacco settlement money despite selling off major brands. Circuit Judge Jeffrey Dana Gillen in Palm Beach County issued his ruling Wednesday, nearly a year after Attorney General...
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Once it stored tobacco, now this 100 year old barn, seen in a Dec. 15, 2017 photo and owned by former tobacco farmer Michael Vaughn, now displays a message for Kentuckians to quit smoking, in Kevil, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
December 22, 2017 - 2:42 pm
FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Michiel Vaughn owes a lot to tobacco. The lucrative crop helped pay for his livelihood in the 1980s when he farmed it in western Kentucky. But a 100-year-old tobacco barn on his property now holds sheep, a colony of pet rabbits and a hand-painted mural urging people to quit...
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December 20, 2017 - 5:42 pm
Recent editorials from North Carolina newspapers: ___ Dec. 18 The Charlotte Observer on if the Carolina Panthers' owner would sell the team to someone who would move it out of Charlotte: Should Carolina Panthers fans worry that owner Jerry Richardson might sell the team to someone who would move it...
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In this photo taken Nov. 28, 2017, Brad Eckenweiler, chief executive of Lifestyle Delivery Systems, poses for a photo while holding cannabis buds from his freezer that will be used to manufacture concentrates in Adelanto, Calif. Lifestyle is what’s known as a “vertically integrated company,” with a hand in every aspect of the business, from producing organic seeds to transportation and over-the-counter sales. (AP Photo/Mike Blood)
December 20, 2017 - 2:08 pm
ADELANTO, Calif. (AP) — Drive by the High Desert Truck Stop, turn down a rutted road by the bail bond signs, slip behind a steel fence edged with barbed wire, and you can glimpse the future of California's emerging legal pot industry. In a boxy warehouse marked only by a street number, an $8...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2012, file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed on an iPad in Philadelphia. Facebook is acknowledging something many already know: Passively scrolling through social media can make you feel bad. The social media giant whose platform has become a daily addiction for hundreds of millions of people sheds light on both sides of the issue a blog post Friday, Dec. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
December 15, 2017 - 7:15 pm
MENLO PARK, Calif. (AP) — It's not quite like tobacco companies warning about the dangers of smoking, but Facebook is acknowledging something many already know: Using social media can be bad for your health. The social media giant whose platform has become a daily addiction for hundreds of millions...
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