United States Supreme Court decisions

FILE - In this June 4, 2018 file photo, baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop after a U.S. Supreme Court issued a limited ruling in his favor after he refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. He is suing Colorado after officials ruled against him in another alleged discrimination case in which his shop refused to make a cake celebrating a gender transition. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 15, 2018 - 3:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — A Colorado baker who insisted his religious beliefs justified his refusal to make a wedding cake for a gay couple — an argument partly supported by the U.S. Supreme Court — has sued the state again for opposing his refusal to bake a cake celebrating a gender transition, his attorneys...
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In this Jan. 23, 2018 photo, Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks at a civics event in Seattle. For years, the country's immigration courts have been besieged by ballooning dockets, lengthy backlogs and a lack of resources. Now, they face a new challenge after a Supreme Court ruling called into question the validity of documents the U.S. government has used for years to deport immigrants back to their countries. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
August 13, 2018 - 3:08 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Immigration courts from Boston to Los Angeles have been experiencing fallout from a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that has caused some deportation orders to be tossed and cases thrown out, bringing more chaos to a system that was already besieged by ballooning dockets and...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, July 31, 2018, file photo, people opposing Proposition A listen to a speaker during a rally in Kansas City, Mo. Missouri votes Tuesday, Aug. 7 on a so-called right-to-work law, a voter referendum seeking to ban compulsory union fees in all private-sector workplaces. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
August 04, 2018 - 4:58 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — On the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling weakening public-sector unions, labor's clout is being put to a new test by a voter referendum in Missouri over whether the state should ban compulsory union fees in all private-sector workplaces. The statewide vote in Tuesday's...
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In this Aug. 1, 2018, photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets with Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kavanaugh’s record suggests he would vote to support abortion restrictions if he joins the high court. But it’s not clear if he would go as far as some abortion rights advocates fear and vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, the case establishing a woman’s right to abortion.(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
August 03, 2018 - 12:07 pm
Twice in the past year, Brett Kavanaugh offered glimpses of his position on abortion that strongly suggest he would vote to support restrictions if confirmed to the Supreme Court. One was in a dissent in the case of a 17-year-old migrant seeking to terminate her pregnancy. The other was a speech...
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FILE - In this Monday, June 25, 2018 file photo, people gather at the Supreme Court awaiting a decision in an Illinois union dues case, Janus vs. AFSCME, in Washington. An Oregon state employee and a labor union have reached a settlement over her lawsuit seeking payback of obligatory union fees, marking the first refund of forced fees since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in late June that government workers can't be required to contribute to labor groups, the employee's lawyers said Monday, July 30, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
July 30, 2018 - 9:50 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon state employee and a labor union have reached a settlement over her lawsuit seeking payback of obligatory union fees, marking the first refund of forced fees since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in late June that government workers can't be required to contribute to labor...
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FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh smiles during a meeting with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kavanaugh says he recognizes that gun, drug and gang violence "has plagued all of us." Still, he believes the Constitution limits how far government can go to restrict gun use to prevent violent crime (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
July 28, 2018 - 6:45 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh says he recognizes that gun, drug and gang violence "has plagued all of us." Still, he believes the Constitution limits how far government can go to restrict gun use to prevent crime. As a federal appeals court judge, Kavanaugh made it...
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Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh smiles during a meeting with Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, a member of the Judiciary Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 18, 2018. The Senate GOP leadership wants to have the confirmation process for Kavanaugh completed in time for him to join the high court at the start of its new term in October. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 18, 2018 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats opposing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's nomination are seizing on remarks he made in 2016 saying he would like to put the "final nail" in a Supreme Court precedent upholding an independent counsel law as constitutional. Republicans are pushing back, saying...
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FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017, file photo, a Planned Parenthood supporter and opponent try to block each other's signs during a protest and counter-protest of abortion in St. Louis. If a Supreme Court majority shaped by President Donald Trump overturns or weakens the right to abortion, the fight over its legalization could return to the states. (AP Photo/Jim Salter, File)
July 12, 2018 - 3:03 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Anticipating renewed fights over abortion, some governors and state lawmakers already are searching for ways to enhance or dismantle the right in their constitutions and laws. President Donald Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court has raised the...
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July 12, 2018 - 2:48 pm
President Donald Trump's appointment of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court has raised the prospect that a new conservative court majority might consider overturning or weakening the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling establishing a nationwide right to abortion. Four states — Louisiana,...
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President Donald Trump shakes hands with Brett Kavanaugh, his Supreme Court nominee, in the East Room of the White House, Monday, July 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
July 10, 2018 - 12:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's nomination of Brett Kavanaugh for the Supreme Court (all times local): 12:30 p.m. Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee are vowing to fight against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, calling him a threat to a woman's right to choose...
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