Virology

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot from a vaccine vial at the Salvation Army in Atlanta. Most doses of vaccine are made in a production process that involves growing viruses in chicken eggs. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
February 15, 2018 - 3:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting the flu shot won't make you spread the disease more, doesn't weaken your immune system but it does offer some protection from getting infected, despite misleading claims on social media. A post on a site called thewilddoc claimed that being vaccinated does more harm than...
Read More
February 12, 2018 - 6:43 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Laura Haynes, University of Connecticut (THE CONVERSATION) Every year, from 5 to 20 percent of the people in the United States will become infected with influenza virus. An average of...
Read More
FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, Brian Madeux, starts to receive the first human gene editing therapy for Hunter syndrome, as his girlfriend Marcie Humphrey, left, applauds at the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, Calif. At right is nurse practitioner Jacqueline Madden. Gene editing aims to permanently change someone's DNA to try to cure a disease. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 06, 2018 - 7:33 pm
A second patient has been treated in a historic gene editing study in California, and no major side effects or safety issues have emerged from the first man's treatment nearly three months ago, doctors revealed Tuesday. Gene editing is a more precise way to do gene therapy, and aims to permanently...
Read More
Biologist Rebecca Gillespie holds a vial of flu-fighting antibodies at the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Health, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017, in Bethesda, Md. Despite 100 years of science, the flu virus too often beats our best defenses because it constantly mutates. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
January 18, 2018 - 3:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The descriptions are haunting. Some victims felt fine in the morning and were dead by night. Faces turned blue as patients coughed up blood. Stacked bodies outnumbered coffins. A century after one of history's most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to...
Read More
Biologist Rebecca Gillespie holds a vial of flu-fighting antibodies at the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Health, Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2017, in Bethesda, Md. Despite 100 years of science, the flu virus too often beats our best defenses because it constantly mutates. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
January 17, 2018 - 1:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The descriptions are haunting. Some victims felt fine in the morning and were dead by night. Faces turned blue as patients coughed up blood. Stacked bodies outnumbered coffins. A century after one of history's most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to...
Read More
In this Friday, Nov. 10, 2017 photo, a rhesus macaques monkey observes kayakers as they navigate along the Silver River in Silver Springs, Fla. Wildlife managers in Florida say they want to remove the roaming monkeys from the state in light of a new study published Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018, that finds some of the animals are excreting a virus that can be dangerous to humans. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
January 10, 2018 - 12:16 pm
ON THE SILVER RIVER, Fla. (AP) — Wildlife managers in Florida say they want to remove roaming monkeys from the state in light of a new study published Wednesday that finds some of the animals are excreting a virus that can be dangerous to humans. Scientists studying a growing population of rhesus...
Read More
December 20, 2017 - 6:27 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Christy Gaines, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (THE CONVERSATION) Although great strides have been made at combating human immunodeficiency virus, leading to better quality of...
Read More
FILE - In this July 1, 2017, file photo, Eugene Kaspersky, Russian antivirus programs developer and chief executive of Russia's Kaspersky Lab, poses for a photo on a balcony at his company's headquarters in Moscow, Russia. The founder of Russian anti-virus firm Kaspersky tells The Associated Press his company did upload classified U.S. documents a couple of years ago, only to delete them immediately after realizing what had happened. Kaspersky's acknowledgement is the first on-the-record confirmation of an incident described earlier this month in three U.S. newspapers.(AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)
October 25, 2017 - 7:28 am
PARIS (AP) — Sometime in 2014, a group of analysts walked into the office of Eugene Kaspersky, the ebullient founder of Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, to deliver some sobering news. Kaspersky's anti-virus software had automatically scraped powerful digital surveillance tools off a...
Read More
September 10, 2017 - 8:40 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Colleen Burge, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (THE CONVERSATION) Oysters, a delicacy eaten on most coastlines of the world, are a multi-billion-dollar industry. They also are...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2017 file photo a technician works at the tunnel of an X-ray laser at the European XFEL project in Schenefeld, Germany. Scientists say the world’s largest X-ray laser is now in operation and will help them capture images of structures and processes at the atomic level. The DESY research center near Hamburg says the laser that went on line Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, flashes 27,000 pulses per second, resulting in a luminance a billion times higher than the best conventional X-ray sources. (Christian Charisius/dpa via AP, file)
September 01, 2017 - 8:30 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists in Germany say the world's largest X-ray laser is now in operation and will help them capture images of structures and processes at an atomic level. The DESY research center near Hamburg said the laser that went online Friday flashes 27,000 pulses per second, resulting in a...
Read More

Pages