Water conservation and preservation

FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2018, file photo, a lead pipe, left, is seen in a hole the kitchen ceiling in the home of Desmond Odom, in Newark, N.J. The Trump administration is proposing a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory rollbacks in many other environmental areas, the administration has called dealing with lead contamination in drinking water a priority. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
October 10, 2019 - 4:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory...
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October 02, 2019 - 10:15 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Trump administration ratcheted up its feud with California on Wednesday as the Environmental Protection Agency issued a notice accusing San Francisco of violating the federal Clean Water Act. Last month, President Donald Trump warned of a potential violation notice, saying...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 11:49 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plans to revoke an Obama-era clean water rule (all times local): 12:15 p.m. The Trump administration says revoking an Obama-era rule on waters and wetlands would provide "much-needed regulatory certainty" for farmers, homebuilders...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 5:51 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. Environmental groups...
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A row of hearts, each with the name of a victim, adorn a growing memorial to those who died aboard the dive boat Conception, seen early Friday morning, Sept. 6, 2019 at the harbor in Santa Barbara, Calif. The Sept. 2 fire took the lives of 34 people on the ship off Santa Cruz Island off the Southern California coast near Santa Barbara (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)
September 06, 2019 - 7:59 pm
From a veteran water polo coach to a Singaporean data scientist, the passengers aboard the ill-fated Conception dive boat were linked by their love for the water. Here are the victims who have been identified so far from the deadly fire that engulfed the vessel, killing 34 people off California's...
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This June 2018 photo provided by Rob McClelland shows Allie Kurtz aboard a sailboat. Kurtz, a 26-year-old scuba diving boat crewmember who loved the ocean and had just landed her dream job, is among multiple victims of a deadly fire that torched a dive boat off Southern California's coast, her family said on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Kurtz recently left a job in movie promotion with Paramount to follow her heart and work on the sea, said her grandmother, Doris Lapporte. (Rob McClelland via AP)
September 05, 2019 - 7:31 pm
Aboard were respected scientists, engineers, free spirits and parents with their teenage and adult children — all brought together over a passion for scuba diving. Two divers were celebrating their birthdays. Here are the victims who have been identified so far from the deadly fire that engulfed...
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Elaine Younger, 11, and Tahvion Williams, 14, right, load water in their family's van at the Newark Health Department in Newark, N.J., Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Residents began picking up bottled water on Monday, days after elevated lead levels were found in homes where city-issued filters had been distributed months ago as part of an ongoing effort to combat contamination. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
August 15, 2019 - 6:48 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's largest city faced off in court Thursday against an environmental group seeking to force officials to expand the distribution of bottled water to more residents facing potentially high lead levels. The arguments in federal court came days after the U.S...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions . The action, which expands the administration's rewrite of...
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President Donald Trump pauses as he speaks during an event about the environment in the East Room of the White House, Monday, July 8, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
July 08, 2019 - 6:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared himself a champion of the environment Monday, working to boost his standing on climate change and pollution issues in advance of the 2020 election despite having launched some of the most sweeping rollbacks in air, water and other protections in...
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FILE - This Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, shows a former iron ore processing plant near Hoyt Lakes, Minn., that would become part of a proposed PolyMet copper-nickel mine. Environmental Protection Agency documents show that its staffers were critical of how Minnesota regulators drafted a key permit for the planned PolyMet copper-nickel mine. And they show the EPA officials concluded the permit would violate federal law because it lacked specific water pollution limits. The EPA released the documents after a court challenge by WaterLegacy. Environmental attorney Paula Maccabee says the EPA's concerns weren't reflected in PolyMet's final water pollution permit. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
June 25, 2019 - 6:39 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A district court must determine if state environmental regulators improperly sought to suppress a federal agency's serious concerns about the pollution risks arising from a proposed copper-nickel mine in northern Minnesota, the state Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday. The St. Paul-...
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