Wildlife

This Thursday, July 19, 2018, photo provided by Colorado Parks and Wildlife shows an orphaned bear cub that was burned by a wildfire healing at a rehabilitation center in Del Norte, Colo. Wildlife officials said Friday that the bear no longer has to wear bandages on her feet, which were severely burned by a wildfire north of Durango. The cub has more than doubled in size to 26 pounds (12 kilograms) since being spotted by firefighters and has left her cage to live in a pen with other cubs at the center. (Joe Lewandowski/Colorado Parks and Wildlife via AP)
July 20, 2018 - 7:40 pm
DENVER (AP) — An orphaned bear cub burned by a Colorado wildfire is healing and gaining weight. Wildlife officials said Friday that the bear no longer has to wear bandages on her feet, which were severely burned by flames north of Durango last month. The cub has more than doubled in size, to 26...
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FILE - In this Oct. 20, 2017, file photo, John Miano of Destin, Fla., holds a monarch butterfly on his fingertip as he waits for the newly tagged insect to take flight during the Panhandle Butterfly House's Monarch Madness festival in Navarre, Fla. The Trump administration is proposing changes to the government's endangered species program that wildlife advocates say could make it harder to protect monarchs. (Devon Ravine/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP, File)
July 19, 2018 - 6:43 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animals and plants and limiting habitat safeguards meant to shield recovering species from harm. Administration officials said the new rules would advance conservation by simplifying and...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2013 file photo, male greater sage grouse perform mating rituals for a female grouse, not pictured, on a lake outside Walden, Colo. In an abrupt reversal, the Pentagon now says it supports a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
July 19, 2018 - 6:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In an abrupt reversal, the Pentagon said Thursday it supports a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. In an email to Congress...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2018 file photo, the Richmond city skyline can be seen on the horizon behind the coal ash ponds along the James River near Dominion Energy's Chesterfield Power Station in Chester, Va. The Trump administration is easing rules for handling toxic coal ash from more than 400 coal-fired power plants across the U.S. after utilities objected to regulations adopted under former President Barack Obama. Environmental Protection Agency acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler said Wednesday, July 18, 2018, the changes will save utilities roughly $30 million annually. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
July 18, 2018 - 9:45 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday eased rules for handling toxic coal ash from more than 400 U.S. coal-fired power plants after utilities pushed back against regulations adopted under former President Barack Obama. Environmental Protection Agency acting Administrator Andrew...
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July 18, 2018 - 6:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is objecting to a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. The Defense Department says in a position paper made...
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July 18, 2018 - 11:19 am
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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FILE--In this Aug. 11, 2017 file photo, visitors approach a former ranch house and barn during a guided hike on the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge near Denver, land that used to be a buffer zone around a nuclear weapons plant. Environmentalists and community activists are trying to stop the refuge from opening to the public this summer, claiming the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not adequately study the safety of the site. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott, File)
July 17, 2018 - 9:13 pm
DENVER (AP) — A retired professor testified Tuesday he found evidence that billions of particles of plutonium had escaped from a former nuclear weapons plant in Colorado and settled on land that is now a wildlife refuge, raising concerns about whether the site is safe for the public. But an...
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In this Oct. 30, 2017, photo provided by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Wildlife Biologist Jason Hawley affixes a GPS tracking collar on a bobcat at the Sessions Woods Wildlife Management in Burlington, Conn. GPS collars were placed on several dozen bobcats in the fall of 2017 to track their movements. The collars are programmed to fall off on and after Aug. 1, 2018. The agency wants to find all the collars, recharge the batteries and place them on other bobcats in the fall to continue the study. (Paul Fusco/Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection via AP)
July 14, 2018 - 8:00 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — In a couple of weeks, collars on cats across the state will be falling off. But it's not some prank or devious experiment — it's one of the largest studies of its kind on bobcats. The GPS collars were placed on 50 bobcats last fall as part of research by wildlife biologists...
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This 1975 microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a cluster of smallpox viruses. On Friday, July 13, 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the first treatment for smallpox _ a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago _ in case the virus is used in a terror attack. (Fred Murphy/CDC via AP)
July 13, 2018 - 7:08 pm
U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox — a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago — in case the virus is used in a terror attack. Smallpox, which is highly contagious, was eradicated worldwide by 1980 after a huge vaccination campaign. But people born since...
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July 13, 2018 - 2:01 pm
BEIJING (AP) — In a story July 12 about the latest developments in the U.S.-China trade war, The Associated Press erroneously reported that 200,000 jobs at an Alabama Hyundai plant could be jeopardized if the U.S. imposes higher auto tariffs. The plant employs 3,500 people. A corrected version of...
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