Wildlife management

In this April 2014 photo provided by the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre at the University of Saskatchewan, a researcher holds a ferret at their facility in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. In 2020, the lab is working with 300 ferrets developing a COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine candidate and testing other vaccine candidates and therapeutics. (VIDO-InterVac at the University of Saskatchewan via AP)
June 02, 2020 - 5:29 am
The global race for a COVID-19 vaccine boils down to some critical questions: How much must the shots rev up someone’s immune system to really work? And could revving it the wrong way cause harm? Even as companies recruit tens of thousands of people for larger vaccine studies this summer, behind...
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In this Monday, May 4, 2020 photo, a wild turkey crosses a field in Freeport, Maine. States around the country are encouraging hunters to hunt turkeys this spring despite social distancing rules. The hunt will look different than usual because of concerns about the virus. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
May 09, 2020 - 8:12 am
FALMOUTH, Maine (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has canceled dozens of spring traditions, from college basketball's Final Four to Easter Sunday services, but there's one rite that's going on largely unfettered — turkey hunting. Every state except Alaska, which is the only state with no turkeys,...
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FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2019, file photo, Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa plays in an NCAA football game in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Tagovailoa is a likely first round pick in the NFL Draft Thursday, April 23, 2020. (AP Photo/Vasha Hunt, File)
April 23, 2020 - 10:43 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Because of Tua Tagovailoa’s ability, the Miami Dolphins were willing to gamble on his durability. The Dolphins made the Alabama quarterback the fifth overall pick in the NFL draft Thursday, and hope he can become a franchise quarterback and the centerpiece of their rebuilding effort...
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April 09, 2020 - 8:35 am
LE PECQ, France (AP) — With humans away, the whales will play. In another sign that wild animals are roaming more freely while locked-down people are sheltering indoors from the coronavirus, a maritime patrol has filmed remarkable images of whales powering through Mediterranean waters off the coast...
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FILE - In this May 2, 2010 photo, Institute of Marine Mammal Sciences researcher Justin Main takes photographs of a dead sea turtle on the beach in Pass Christian, Miss. The National Wildlife Federation released a report Tuesday, April 7, 2020, looking at Gulf restoration after the BP oil spill. The report states serious ongoing harm to dolphins, turtles and other wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)
April 07, 2020 - 3:42 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A decade after the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, dolphins, turtles and other wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico are still seriously at risk, according to a report released Tuesday. The fact that the Gulf hasn’t fully recovered is “hardly surprising given the enormity of...
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ARCHIVO - En esta fotografía del 27 de octubre de 2019, el quarterback de los Panthers de Carolina Cam Newton en la banca durante la segunda mitad del partido de la NFL contra los 49ers de San Francisco, en Santa Clara, California. (AP Foto/Ben Margot, Archivo)
April 07, 2020 - 10:20 am
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Cam Newton says he feels like a “fish out of a water” being a free agent for the first time in his nine-year NFL career. Newton said during a conversation with Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul on Instagram Live on Monday that being released by the Carolina Panthers has...
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FILE - In this March 29, 2020, file photo, a bird flies among wind turbines near King City, Mo. The Trump administration is moving to scale back criminal enforcement of a century-old law protecting most American wild bird species. The former director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told AP billions of birds could die if the government doesn't hold companies liable for accidental bird deaths. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
March 31, 2020 - 5:15 pm
BUTTE, Mont. (AP) — At a former open pit copper mine filled with billions of gallons of toxic water, sirens and loud pops from propane cannons echo off the granite walls to scare away birds so they don’t land. After several thousand migrating snow geese perished in the Berkeley Pit's acidic, metal-...
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This notice posted on the Twitter account of Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister on Monday, March 30, 2020, seeks the public's help for new leads in the disappearance of Jack "Don" Lewis, the former husband of a big cat sanctuary owner featured in the new Netflix series “Tiger King.” Chronister posted that the popularity of the seven-part documentary made it a good time to ask for new leads in Lewis' 1997 disappearance. (Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister via AP)
March 31, 2020 - 1:46 pm
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — It might be the biggest diversion from the pandemic: binge-watching the luridly fascinating Netflix documentary “Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness.” Now a Florida sheriff is asking the public for tips regarding one of the lingering mysteries raised in the recently released...
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FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 17, 2020 file photo, a bison walks through the snow in Yellowstone National Park's Lamar Valley near Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyo. Park officials said hundreds of bison were removed from the park's herds this winter by hunters and a controversial slaughter program. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File )
March 30, 2020 - 2:10 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park is done capturing wild bison for the year after rounding up almost 550 of the wild animals and sending most to slaughter as part of a population control program, park officials said. The culling is carried out under a legal agreement between federal...
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In this March 11, 2006 photo provided by the New England Aquarium, a whale swims off the coast of Georgia with fresh propeller cuts on its back. The whale is assumed to have died from its injuries, as it was never seen again. Ship strikes are one of the biggest causes of mortality for large whales, and scientists say the problem is getting worse because of the warming of the oceans. (Brenna Kraus/The New England Aquarium via AP)
March 28, 2020 - 12:14 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Climate change is imperiling the world's largest animals by increasing the likelihood of fatal collisions between whales and big ships that ply the same waters. Warming ocean temperatures are causing some species of whales in pursuit of food to stray more frequently into...
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