Wildlife poaching and smuggling

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, center, R-Ky., walks to his office early Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, at the Capitol in Washington. The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday, halting all but the most essential operations. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
January 20, 2018 - 7:01 am
Here are the AP's latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EST. ----------------------- NEW/DEVELOPING ----------------------- Adds KOREAS TENSIONS; THAILAND-WILDLIFE SMUGGLING; AFRICA-GUINEA WORM; PENCE-MIDDLE EAST; SAG AWARDS-PREVIEW; SYRIA; CHINA-US-SOUTH CHINA SEA;...
Read More
Police process suspected wildlife trafficker Boonchai Bach, a 40-year-old Thai of Vietnamese descent, Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Bangkok, Thailand. During a press conference Saturday, police announced the arrest of Boonchai who allegedly fueled much of Asia's illegal wildlife trade for over the last decade. (AP Photo/Tassanee Vejpongsa)
January 20, 2018 - 2:22 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Thai police have arrested a suspected kingpin of wildlife trafficking who allegedly fueled much of Asia's illegal trade for over a decade, officials said Saturday. Boonchai Bach, a 40-year-old Thai of Vietnamese descent, was arrested Friday in the northeastern border province of...
Read More
In this Jan. 8, 2018 photo, Wendy Hapgood, left, and John Steward, directors of the Wild Tomorrow Fund, measure an elephant tusk at a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation warehouse in Albany, N.Y. The tusk was part of a $4.5 million seizure of illegal ivory from a New York City antiques shop. To help support anti-poaching efforts, scientists will use carbon dating to determine when the elephant was killed and DNA analysis to pinpoint where it came from in Africa. (AP Photo/Mary Esch)
January 15, 2018 - 11:09 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Scientists are using information gleaned from both illegal ivory art and elephant dung to provide clues that could help save the lives of pachyderms that are being slaughtered for their tusks in Africa. The wildlife detective work involves cutting up seized artifacts including...
Read More
Thai customs officials display seized ivory during a press conference in Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018. Thai authorities seized 148 kilograms full elephant tusk and 31 tusk fragments originating from Nigeria destined for China worth over 15 million baht ($469,800). (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
January 12, 2018 - 3:39 am
BANGKOK (AP) — Thai authorities have seized 148 kilograms (326 pounds) of African elephant ivory, including three large tusks, worth around 15 million baht ($469,800) from a Bangkok airport. The haul from Nigeria consisted of the tusks and 31 tusk fragments that were seized Jan. 5 after the cargo...
Read More
In this May 19, 2011, photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Imnaha wolf pack's alpha male OR-4 is lies down after being refitted with a working GPS collar in Wallowa County east of Joseph, Ore. It's a political debate playing out against the backdrop of a rapidly growing wolf population, a jump in wolf poaching and demands from ranchers and hunters who say the predators are decimating herds and spooking big game. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
November 23, 2017 - 3:12 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Wolves were once so plentiful in the abundant forests that would become Oregon that the earliest settlers gathered from far and wide to discuss how to kill them. Those "wolf meetings" in the 1840s, spawned by a common interest, eventually led to the formation of the Oregon...
Read More
In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 9, 2010, elephants use their trunks to smell for possible danger in the Tsavo East national park, Kenya. The Trump administration is lifting a federal ban on the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
November 18, 2017 - 11:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he's delaying a new policy allowing trophies of African elephants shot for sport to be imported until he can review "all conservation facts." The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday it would allow such importation, arguing that encouraging...
Read More
In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 9, 2010, elephants use their trunks to smell for possible danger in the Tsavo East national park, Kenya. The Trump administration is lifting a federal ban on the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
November 18, 2017 - 5:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he's delaying a new policy allowing the body parts of African elephants shot for sport to be imported until he can review "all conservation facts." The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday it would allow such importation, arguing that...
Read More
In this file photo taken Tuesday, March 9, 2010, elephants use their trunks to smell for possible danger in the Tsavo East national park, Kenya. The Trump administration is lifting a federal ban on the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport. (AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo, File)
November 16, 2017 - 4:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said it will allow the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport, contending that encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill them will aid the vulnerable species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said in a written notice issued...
Read More
November 15, 2017 - 11:01 am
MIAMI (AP) — An Irish man has been sentenced to 18 months in U.S. prison for the international smuggling of a cup carved from the horn of an endangered rhinoceros. Court records show a Miami judge imposed the sentence Tuesday on 40-year-old Michael Hegarty. He pleaded guilty earlier this year to...
Read More
In this photo taken Thursday, July 27, 2017, an anti-trafficking "sniffer" dog inspects passengers' luggage for contraband on the tarmac of the airport in Juba, South Sudan. A two-dog team has been tasked with protecting the entirety of war-torn South Sudan from a flow of ivory and illegal animals, as advocacy groups say the country has become a critical African hub for traffickers. (AP Photo/Mariah Quesada)
November 04, 2017 - 5:33 am
JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — Leaping from the van, South Sudan's only two patrol dogs raced toward passengers disembarking a plane in the capital, Juba. After frantically sniffing their luggage, one dog abruptly sat in front of a wary young man and stared at his bag. Removing a piece of ivory from a...
Read More

Pages