Youth violence

This combination of photos shows shows younger and older photos of "juvenile lifers," top row from left, William Washington, Jennifer M. Pruitt and John Sam Hall; middle row from left, Damion Lavoial Todd, Ahmad Rashad Williams and Evan Miller; bottom row from left, Giovanni Reid, Johnny Antoine Beck, and Bobby Hines. During the late 1980 and into the 1990s, many states enacted laws to punish juvenile criminals like adults and the U.S. became an international outlier, sentencing offenders under 18 to live out their lives in prison for homicide and, sometimes, rape, kidnapping, armed robbery. (Michigan Department of Corrections, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Lawrence County Alabama Sheriff's Office, Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)
July 31, 2017 - 2:19 am
DETROIT (AP) — Courtroom 801 is nearly empty when guards bring in Bobby Hines, hands cuffed in front of navy prison scrubs. It's been more than 27 years since Hines stood before a judge in this building. He was 15 then, just out of eighth grade, answering for his role in the murder of a man over a...
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In this Friday, Sept. 30, 2016 photo, Ahmad Williams wears handcuffs as he appears for his resentencing hearing at the Kent County Courthouse in Grand Rapids. Williams, who was convicted in the 1988 fatal shooting of Derrick Pimpleton, is one of several "juvenile lifers" to be resentenced because of Supreme Court rulings that ended mandatory no-parole sentences for crimes committed by juveniles. (Cory Morse/The Grand Rapids Press via AP)
July 31, 2017 - 12:47 am
In the past decade or so, the U.S. Supreme Court and state legislatures have taken steps to scale back the most extreme punishments for juvenile criminals. Here's how the laws have changed and some reasons why teens who were sentenced to life without parole are now getting a second chance: ___ WHY...
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This combination of photos shows shows younger and older photos of "juvenile lifers," top row from left, William Washington, Jennifer M. Pruitt and John Sam Hall; middle row from left, Damion Lavoial Todd, Ahmad Rashad Williams and Evan Miller; bottom row from left, Giovanni Reid, Johnny Antoine Beck, and Bobby Hines. During the late 1980 and into the 1990s, many states enacted laws to punish juvenile criminals like adults and the U.S. became an international outlier, sentencing offenders under 18 to live out their lives in prison for homicide and, sometimes, rape, kidnapping, armed robbery. (Michigan Department of Corrections, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, Lawrence County Alabama Sheriff's Office, Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)
July 31, 2017 - 12:10 am
DETROIT (AP) — Courtroom 801 is nearly empty when guards bring in Bobby Hines, hands cuffed in front of navy prison scrubs. It's been more than 27 years since Hines stood before a judge in this building. He was 15 then, just out of eighth grade, answering for his role in the murder of a man over a...
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Christopher Lee looks through a window secured by bars towards a barbed wire fence surrounding the building from a conference room at the Minnesota Sex Offender Program in St. Peter, Minn., on March 28, 2017. Lee has been in the program since 2005, four days before he turned 19. An ongoing Associated Press investigation has documented how K-12 schools in the United States can fail to protect students in their care from sexual assault, sometimes minimizing or even covering up incidents. Schools also struggle to help sexually aggressive students, both before and after they do lasting harm. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
May 15, 2017 - 6:16 am
The children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. There is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate. Thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression...
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Christopher Lee looks through a window secured by bars towards a barbed wire fence surrounding the building from a conference room at the Minnesota Sex Offender Program in St. Peter, Minn., on March 28, 2017. Lee has been in the program since 2005, four days before he turned 19. An ongoing Associated Press investigation has documented how K-12 schools in the United States can fail to protect students in their care from sexual assault, sometimes minimizing or even covering up incidents. Schools also struggle to help sexually aggressive students, both before and after they do lasting harm. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
May 15, 2017 - 3:23 am
The children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. There is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate. Thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression...
Read More
Christopher Lee looks through a window secured by bars towards a barbed wire fence surrounding the building from a conference room at the Minnesota Sex Offender Program in St. Peter, Minn., on March 28, 2017. Lee has been in the program since 2005, four days before he turned 19. An ongoing Associated Press investigation has documented how K-12 schools in the United States can fail to protect students in their care from sexual assault, sometimes minimizing or even covering up incidents. Schools also struggle to help sexually aggressive students, both before and after they do lasting harm. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
May 15, 2017 - 12:28 am
The children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. There is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate. Thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression...
Read More

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